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Full text of "TRSTimes - Volume 8 No. 6 (1995-11)(TRSTimes Publications)(US)"

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Volume 8. No. 6 



Nov/Decl995 - $4.00 




-^^\imm 




UTILITY FOR TRS-80 MODEL 

4ANDLS-DOS6.3.1 

A 'MUST HAVE' FOR ALL 
LS-DOS 6^3.1 OWNERS. 



DISABLE PASSWORD CHECK IN F0RM4T/CMD 

FORMAT DOUBLE-SIDED AS DEFAULT 

FORMAT 80 TRACKS AS DEFAULT 

DISABLE VERIFY AFTER FORMAT 

CHANGE 'DIR' TO 'D' 

CHANGE 'CAT TO 'C 

DIRyCAT WITH (I) PARAMETER AS DEFAULT 

DIR/CAT WITH (S,T) PARAMETERS AS DEFAULT 

CHANGE 'REMOVE' TO 'DEL' 

CHANGE 'RENAME' TO 'REN* 

CHANGE 'MEMORY' TO 'MEM' 

CHANGE 'DEVICE' TO 'DEV 

DISABLE THE BOOT 'DATE' PROMPT 

DISABLE THE BOOT 'TIME* PROMPT 

DISABLE FILE PASSWORD PROTECTION 

ENABLE EXTENDED ERROR MESSAGES 



DR. PATCH MODIFIES LS-DOS 6.3.1 TO DO 
THINGS THAT WERE NEVER BEFORE POSSIBLE. 

DOMPLETELY SELF-CONTAINED - MENU-DRIVEN 
FOR MAXIMUM USER CONVENIENCE. 

FAST & SAFE - EACH MODIFICATION IS EASILY 
REVERSED TO NORMAL DOS OPERATION. 

DISABLE PASSWORD CHECK IN BACKUP/CMD 
BACKUP WITH (I) PARAMETER AS DEFAULT 
BACKUP WITH VERIFY DISABLED 
DISABLE BACKUP 'LIMIT PROTECTION 
DISABLE PASSWORD CHECK IN PURGE 
PURGE WITH (I) PARAMETER AS DEFAULT 
PURGE WITH (S,T) PARAMETERS AS DEFAULT 
PURGE WITH (Q=:N) PARAMETER AS DEFAULT 
IMPLEMENT THE DOS 'KILL' COMMAND 
CHANGE DOS PROMPT TO CUSTOM PROMPT 
TURN 'AUTO BREAK DISABLE' OFF 
TURN 'SYSGEN' MESSAGE OFF 
BOOT WITH NON-BLINKING CURSOR 
BOOT WITH CUSTOM CURSOR 
BOOT WITH CLOCK ON 
BOOT WITH FAST KEY-REPEAT 



DR. PATCH IS THE ONLY PROGRAM OF ITS TYPE EVER WRITTEN 

FOR THE TRS-80 MODEL 4 AND LS-DOS 6.3.1. 

TRIBUTED EXCLUSIVELY BY TRSTIMES MAGAZINE ON A STANDI 
)0S 6.3.1 DATA DISKETTE. ALONG WITH WRITTEN DOCUMENTATl 




ii 





NO SHIPPING & HANDLING TO U.S & CANADA. ELSEWHERE PLEASE ADD $4.00 

(U.S CURRENCY ONLY, PLEASE) 

TRSTimes magazine - deptl DP 

5721 Topanga Canyon Blvd. #4 

Woodland Hills. CA 91367 



DON'T LET YOUR LS-DOS 6,3.1 BE WITHOUT IT! 



Volume 8. No. 6 - Nov/Dec 1995 - $4.00 



PUBLISHER-EDITOR 

Lance Wolstrup 

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

Roy T. Beck 

Dr. Allen Jacobs 

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 

San Gabriel Tandy Users Group 

Valley TRS-80 Users Group 

Valley Hackers' TRS-80 Users 

Group 



TRSTimes is published bi- 
monthly by TRSTimes Publica- 
tions. 5721 Topanga Canyon 
Blvd., Suite 4. Woodland Hills, CA 
9 1367. U.S.A. (818) 716-7154. 

Publication months are January, 
March, May, July, September and 
November. 

Entire contents (c) copyright 
1995 by TRSTimes Publications. 
No part of this publication may 
be reprinted or reproduced by 
any means without the prior 
written permission from the pub- 
lishers. 

All programs are published for 
personal use only. All rights re- 
served. 

1995 subscription rates (6 issues): 
UNITED STATES $21.00 
CANADA $22.00 (U.S.) 

EUROPE, CENTRAL & SOUTH 

AMERICA: 

J26,00 for surface mail or $34.00 

for air mail. (U.S. currency only) 

ASIA, AUSTRALIA & NEW 

ZEALAND: 

$28.00 for surface mail or $36.00 

for air mail. (U.S. currency only) 

Article submissions froni our 
readers are welcomed and en- 
couraged. Anything pertaining to 
the TRS-80 will be evaluated for 
possible publication. Please send 
hardcopy and, if at all possible a 
disk with the material saved in 
ASCII format. Any disk format is 
acceptable, but please note on la- 
bel which format is used. 



A HARD DRIVE ON A MODEL I? 5 

Roy T. Beck 

XREF FOR MODEL 100 7 

TRSTimes Vault 

TRSCHORD 9 

Lance Wolstrup 

BEAT THE GAME 19 

Sorcerer & Suspect 
Daniel Myers 



SOME THOUGHTS ON 
RADIO SHACK PRINTERS 



LITTLE ORPHAN EIGHTY 
Editorial 



26 



32 




TIRED OF SLOPPY DISK LABELS? 
TIRED OF IVOT KNOWIIVG WHAT'S OI^ YOUR DISKS? 

YOU NEED "DL" 

«DL" will automatically read your TRSDOS6/LDOS compatible disk 

and then print a neat label, listing the visible files (maximum 16). 

You may use the ^change' feature to select the filenames to print. 

You may even change the diskname and diskdate. 

"DL" is written in 100% Z-80 machine code for efficiency and speed. 

"DL" is available for TRS-80 Model 4/4P/4D 

using TRSDOS 6.2/LS-DOS 6.3.0 & 6.3.1 

with an Epson compatible or Tandy DMP series printer. 

"BI.'' for Model 4 only $9.95 

TRSTImes magazine - Dept. "DL" 

5721 Topanga Canyon Blvd., Suite 4 

Woodland Hills, €A 91367 



HARD DRIVES FOR SALE 

Genuine Radio Shack Drive Boxes with Controller, Power Supply 

and Cables. Formatted for TRS 6.3, Installation JCL included. 

Hardware write protect operational. 

Documentation and new copy of MISOSYS RSHARD5/6 included. 

90 days warranty. 

Call for LOW prices on 

5 meg, 10 meg, 15 meg and 20 meg drives 




Roy T. Beck 

2153 Cedarhurst Dr. 

Los Angeles, CA 

(213) 664-5059 




A Hard Drive on a Model I? 

by Roy T. Beck 




As you all probably 
know, the Radio Shack 
hard drives for the TRS 
series became available 
when the Model III was 
state of the art. The price 
tag, initially, was $2500 
for a master drive (5 
megs) dnd $2000 for 
each slave, (also 5 megs), 
of which three could be 
attached to the master, 
for a grand total of 20 
megs! Them was the 
days! 



Not long after, R/S began scaling the prices 
down to something a httle more reasonable, but they 
remained pricey. Then the Model 4 came along, and 
for purposes of upward compatibility, it had the 
same 50 line interface as the Model III, allowing the 
hard drives to be operated on the Models III or 4. 
But what about the poor, lonely, obsolete Model I? 

To provide some surcease for the Model I 
owners, R/S began scratching its collective head to 
see what could be done for the Model I. Bear in mind 
that the Model I did not have a 50 line interface; it 
had an external bus connection of 40 lines, which 
had to be the focal point for any attachment beyond 
the printer port and floppy drive port, both of which 
were 34 lines. 

The solution, as engineered by R/S was an 
adapter box with a short cable out of each end, one 
with 40 lines to connect to the Model I "screen 
printer connection", which was in reahty the bus of 
the computer and the other with 50 lines to connect 
to the hard drive cable. Actually the 34 line cable 
lacked a couple of lines, which is another story for 
another day, but it had the essentials for the hard 
drives. Being a nosy type, I have dissected and 
analyzed the adapter. Cat No 26-1103. Mostly, it 
just interconnects the appropriate lines from the 
Model I to those in the 50 line cable. The only quirk 
i^•. the presence of two transistors and two resistors 
in the httle box, which contains a card measuring 
about 2" by 2". 

The 26-1103 kit contains, besides the adapter, a 
set of 3 disks containing a version of LDOS, V 5. 1.3, 



I beheve, plus the necessary driver, and some utility 
programs. In addition, there is a supplement to the 
manual which you received when you bought the 
Model III master hard drive. This supplementary 
manual was supposed to include aU the additional 
information necessary to allow you to run the hard 
drive under LDOS for the Model I. (One crucial 
piece of information was omitted; more on that 
later). Another limitation was that the Model I kit 
was limited to the use of 5 meg drives only; 
Considering how many Model I programs could fit 
into a 5 meg drive, this probably was not a real 
restriction. 

Note that this setup required LDOS V 5.1.3 for 
the Model I. TRS-DOS V 2.3 was not provided for. 
Note also the Model III DOS never provided for hard 
drive operation. Not that it couldn't have been done, 
it just was never provided for. Another useful piece 
of history is that NEWDOS 80 V2.5 (note the 
version number) also could operate the hard drive, 
but only the version of the hard drive with the large 
controller board. R/S being R/S, when they came out 
with the later, smaller controller board, didn't quite 
attain full compatibility with the earlier board. (Of 
course, they didn't announce this fact)! 

I stumbled over this discrepancy when hard 
drives were quite popular. I sold a package with the 
later, small controller board to a dentist for his office 
system. He came back to me right away with a 
squawk that he couldn't get the thing to format 
under NEWDOS 80 V 2.5. I struggled with it also, 
and found that it worked just fme with the old 
controller board, which I suppUed to him in place of 
the later controller. But what was the difference? I 
published a note in CN-80 about this problem, and 
shortly a letter came to me from AustraHa! Some one 
there had been bitten by this same bug some time 
before, and fortunately had pubHshed it in a 
newsletter down under. The person who wrote to me 
had seen the earHer note, and passed it along to me. 
Newsletters and their readers are great! Even 
better, the patch for the NEWDOS 80 Formatter 
code was only one byte. That is really elegant 
patching. 

All of this history came back to me recently 
when a local club member inherited a Model I from 
his father, and after getting acquainted with the 
machine, decided he would Hke to add a hard drive 



TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



Page 5 



to it. Of course, I had all the hardware plus the 26- 
1 103 adapter kit. I rashly promised he could pick up 
the whole hard drive system at a certain club 
meeting. A few days before, I decided I had better 
get the package together and also test it out for 
proper operation. I planned to use a drive which had 
previously been operating on a Model 4, and which 
of course had various files on the drive. 

The disks provided with the Model I adapter 
package include LDOS V5.1.3 and a couple of 
auxiliary disks; all well and good. However, R/S 
tried to simpUfy everything by providing a JCL file 
which would both partition and format the drive in 
one sequence, with no further action required by the 
user. For a beginner with no previous hard drive 
experience, this is a fine idea. Of course, it does not 
allow the user to arrange his own paritioning, but 
with only 5 megs available, there reaUy isn't much 
space to do any cute partitioning. 

If the drive being used is unformatted, all is well 
and good. The DO file will proceed to place 4 
partitions on the drive, one on each of the four 
heads. The gotcha is if the drive has been previously 
formatted, and you don't know the password 
previously used. In this case, the formatter requires 
you to supply the password of the previous setup 
before it wiU reformat the drive.!!!!! 

After connecting up all the cables via the 
adapter, I attempted to reformat the drive. The 
formatter appeared to format OK, but when it tried 
to verify, it completely failed. What the heck? I tried 
everything I knew, but the software just would not 
reformat that drive. 

I realized I had a password problem, but what 
could I do about it? One tedious way would have 
been to install that 5 meg drive on a Model 4, format 
it there with a known password, and then go back to 
the Mod I. But this situation could not be unique, so 
there had to be a way around it. I went back to my 
RSHARD documentation, and rediscovered the 
solution for the corresponding situation for either 
the Mod III or 4. Since Roy Soltoff of MISOSYS 
wrote all these driver programs, it seemed logical 
that the missing parameter in the Mod I was 
probably similar, maybe the same as the Mods III 
and 4. Sure enough, the RSHARD manual noted the 
parameter ABS to be added to the FORMAT 
command when dealing with a previously formatted 
Mod III or 4. Since the Mod I documentation showed 
the DO command for the Mod I also accepted various 
parameters, I reasoned the override parameter had 
to go in the DO command string. I tried ,ABS as an 
add-on to the DO command, and sure enough, it 

Page 6 



worked. The problem was that the supplementary 
pamphlet did not include this crucial element, I now 
had the 5 meg drive up and running and working 
correctly. And I stiU had about 6 hours before the 
promised delivery time. Whew! I made it! As 
someone once remarked, "The devil is in the details", 
and this seems to apply in many fields of endeavor. 

Anyway, we now have a new user of a Model I 
operating very happOy with a 5 meg hard drive, and 
he is rapidly becoming computer Uterate. I am sure 
he wiU be moving to more advanced hardware (a 
Model 4?) before long, but for now he is learning his 
way around disc BASIC and the operating system at 
a great rate. 

Several years ago, I received a phone call from a 
fellow in Virginia who had been steered to me by 
another party. He told me he also wanted to run a 
Model I with a hard drive, but didn't have the 
necessary adapter. However, he did have the 
internal circuitry of the adapter, and intended to 
build it up from components on a piece of perf-board. 
I asked him where he had gotten the adapter 
schematic diagram, and he said some one in the 
midwest had sent him a copy from some other 
source. Out of curiosity, I asked him to read me the 
heading on the pieces of paper. To our mutual 
surprise, it was a Xerox copy of the schematic I had 
drawn up several years before! I have no idea how it 
got to him, but it did, and he was able to build it up. 
All he needed then was the driver files to make it 
work! A perfect example of good communication 
between user group members. 

I realize all of this is just history now, as hard 
drives are being built in the gigabjte-plus size range 
now, with anything less than 540 megs being treated 
with disdain. However, there is still interest in our 
antiques, and Lance and I try to provide something 
for everyone. 

I should note that use of hard drives on Models 
III and 4 is a Httle simpler, and Lance published an 
excellent article on this subject in the May/June 
issue of TRSTimes, Vol. 8, No 3. I recommend it to 
you. 

In case anyone is interested, I still have a couple of the 
Mod I adapter kits which I will make available for a 
reasonable price. Of course, you need a Mod I and a R/S 5 
meg drive to go \\ith it, (I still have drives available, also) 
but you could haNC some fun with all of this. I don't really 
expect many of you to want to connect a 5 meg hard drive to 
a Model 1, but I hope this story may be of interest to you 
aificionados of the TRS machines. 



TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 




from the TRSTimes Vault 




XREF.BA is an interesting and useful utility for 
programmers, byte fyters, and other kooky types. 
The program works on a .DO version of any BASIC 
program, to produce two lists: 

1) All variables used in the program, and the line 
numbers in which they appear. 

2) Line references... lines to which execution 
branches, and a list of the Unes which send it there 
(through GOTO, GOSUB, etc.) 

All output is contained in a file named 
•VAJRLST.DO". Be aware an intermediate file 
•OUTPUT.DO' is created and killed. 

The program is just under 3900 bytes in .BA 
form. It requires a fair amount of free space. I've 
XREFed 4 and 5K programs easily. Run it... t>T3e in 
program name to be XREF'ed, and sit back and 
watch. 

1 GOTO 10 

2 'XREF.BA 

7 IFLEN(A$)<3THENQF=0:GOTO9 

8 FORX=lTOLEN(A$):IFMID$(A$,X,l)o" "THEN 
QF=1:G0T09ELSENEXTX 

9 RETURN 

10 CLS:MAXFILES=2:CLEAR5500: 
XN$=CHR$(27)+"p":XF$=CHR$(27)+"q" 
15DIIMV$(200),L$(150),R$(150),VA$(50): 
V$(0)=" ":L$(0)=" ":CR$=CHR$(13)+CHR$(10) 
20 FILES:PRINT@250,".DO File to XREF?";: 
INPUTF$ 

25 TS$=TIME$:0FENF$F0RINPUTAS1: 
OPEN"OUTPUT"FOR 0UTPUTAS2 
30 IFEOF(1)THEN400 



35LINEINPUT#1,A$ 

40 GOSUB 165 

45 PRINT:PRINTLN$;A$ 

50GOSUB115 

60 GOSUB7:IFQF=1THENQF=OELSE30 

62 GOSUB 185 

70 GOSUB7:IFQF=1THENQF=OELSE30 

72 GOSUB340 

80 GOSUB7:IFQF=1THENQF=OELSE30 

82 GOSUB280 

85 PRINT" ";XN$;A$;XF$ 

100 PRINT#2,LN$;A$ 

105 GOTO30 

115 C=INSTR(A$,"DATA"): 

IFCTHENA$=MID$(A$,1,C-1) 

120C=INSTR(A$,CHR$(34)):IFC=0THENGOTO145 

125C1=INSTR(MID$(A$,C+1),CHR$(34)): 

IFC1=0THENC1=LEN(A$) 

130 IFC=0ANDC1=0THEN145 

135A$=LEFT$(A$,C-1)+MID$(A$,C+C1+1): 

GOTO 120 

140 C=INSTR(A$," "): 

IFCTHENA$=LEFT$(A$,C-1)+MID$(A$,C+1): 

GOTO140ELSEA$=" "+A$ 

145 C=INSTR(A$,'""): 

IFC>OTHENA$=LEFT$(A$,C- 1) 

150 C=INSTR(A$,"REM"): 

IFC>OTHENA$=LEFT$(A$,C- 1) 

155 RETURN 

165 C=INSTR(A$," "):A1$=LEFT$(A$,C-1) 

170 A$=MID$(A$,C) 

175LN$=SPACE$(5-LEN(A1$))+A1$:RETURN 

185 REST0RE:F0RX=1T06:READT$ 

190 C=INSTR(A$,T$):IFC=0THEN230 

195MID$(A$,C,LEN(T$))=SPACE$(LEN(T$)) 

200LF$="":FORX1=C+LEN(T$)TOLEN(A$) 

205 X1$=MID$(A$,X1,1):IFX1$=" "THEN220 

ELSEIF(VAL(LF$)=0ANDASC(X1$)>58)THEN230 

ELSEIFASC(X1$)>58THEN225 

210IFX1$=":"THEN225ELSEIFX1$="," 

THENGOSUB245:GOTO220 

215 LF$=LF$+X1$:MID$(A$,X1,1)=" " 

220NEXTX1 

225IFVAL(LF$)=0THEN230ELSEGOSUB245 

230 IFC=0THENNEXTXELSE190 

231 U$=".:;,)@+-*A''=o":Al$="": 
F0RX=1T0LEN(A$) 
232B$=MID$(A$,X,1) 

234 IFINSTR(U$,B$)THENB$=" " 

235 A1$=A1$+B$:NEXTX 



TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



Page 7 



239 A$=A1$:RETURN 

245 LX$=STR$(VALa.N$)): 

LF$=SPACE$(5.LEN(LF$))+LF$ 

250FORZ=1TOL:IFLF$=LEFT$(L$(Z),5)THEN 

IFRIGHT$(L$(Z),LEN(LX$))=LX$THEN265 

ELSEL$(Z)=L$(Z)+",''+LX$:GOT0275ELSENEXTZ 

255FORZ=LTO0STEF-l: 

IFLEFT$(L$(Z),5)>LF$THENL$(Z+1)=L$(Z): 

GOT0265 

260L$(Z+l)=LF$+"."+STR$(VAL(LN$)):GOTO270 

265 NEXTZ:GOT0275 

270L=L+1 

275 LF$="":RETURN 

280 FORX=lTO50:VA$(X)="":NEXTX 

282 Y=1:A1$="":F0RX=1T0LEN(A$): 

B$=MID$(A$,X, 1):B=ASC(B$) 

230 IFB=32 THENSF=l:GOT0326 

300 IFSFTHEN320 

310IFINSTR("%#!$1234567890",B$)THEN325 

315 IFB=40THENSF=l:GOTO325 

320 IFB>64ANDB<91THENSF=0ELSE330 

325 VA$(Y)=VA$(Y)+B$: 

IFX=LEN(A$)THEN326ELSEIFSF=0THEN330 

326FORZ=0TOY-l 

327 IFVA$(Y)=VA$(Z)THENVA$(Y)="": 
GOTO330ELSENEXTZ 

328 A1$=A1$+" "+VA$(Y):Y=Y+1 

330 NEXTX:A$=MID$(A1$,1):RETURN 

340IFRF=lTHEN345ELSEFORJ=lTO150: 

READR$(J):IFR$(J)="XXX"THENRF=l:GOT0345 

ELSENEXTJ 

345F0RX=1T0J-1 

350 C=INSTR(A$,R$(X)):IFC=0THEN360 

355 A$=LEFT$(A$,C- 1)+SPACE$(LEN(R$(X)))+ 

MID$(A$,(C+LEN(R$(X)))):GOTO350 

360 NEXTX:RETURN 

400 V=0:CLS:PRINT@160,"Compiling List" 

405 CL0SE:0PEN"0UTPUT"F0RINPUTAS1 

410 ONERRORGOT0465:LINEINPUT#l,A$ 

415LN$=""+LEFT$(A$,5):A$=MID$(A$,7) 

420 C=INSTR(A$," "): 

IFCTHENV1$=LEFT$(A$,C- 1): 

A$=MTD$(A$,C+l):GOTO430 

425 IFLEN(A$)THENV1$=A$:A$="": 

GOTO430ELSE410 

429 ONERRORGOTO570 

430 V1$=V1$+SPACE$(5-LEN(V1$)) 
432 LX$=STR$(VAL(LN$)) 

435 FORY=0TOV: 

IFVl$oLEFT$(V$(Y).5)THENNEXTY: 

GOTO450 

440IFRIGHT$(V$(Y),LEN(LX$))=LX$THEN420 

445 V$(Y)=V$(Y)+","+LX$:GOTO420 

450FORZ=VTO0STEP-l: 

IFLEFT$(V$(Z),5)>V1$THENV$(Z+1)=V$(Z): 

GOTO460 

455V$(Z+l)=Vl$+"-"+LX$:V=V+l:GOTO420 



460 NEXTZ 

465 IFERR054THEN 

PRINrError ";ERR;" in line ";ERL:STOP 

ELSEKILL-GUTPUT.DG" 

475 CI^:0PEN"VARLST.D0"F0RGUTPUTAS2 

480 PRINT#2,"Variable List for: ^FSjCRSiDAYS;" "; 

DATE$;" ";TS$;CR$ 

485 PRINT#2,"Var. ■ found in Unes:" 

490 F0RJ=1T0V:PRINT#2,V$(J):NEXTJ: 

PRINT#2,CR$;CHR$(128);CR$ 

495 PRINT#2," Line References for: ";F$ 

500 PRINT#2," Goto- from lines:",CR$ 

505 F0RJ=1T0L:PRINT#2,L$(J):NEXTJ 

510 PRINT#2,CR$;CR$;"TIME= "iTIMES 

515 CLOSE:MENU 

525 DATA"THEN","GOTO","GOSUB","RESUME", 

"ELSE","RESTORE" 

530DATA"STGP","LPRINr,"PRINT#","PRINr. 

"abs","asc","atn","cdbl",''cint","cos", 

"csrlin","gsng","eof" 

535data"erl","error","exp","fix","fre", 

"himem","mem","instr","len","log","lpos", 

"max","ram","peek","using" 

540data"lcgpy","pos","rnd","sgn","sqr", 

"tab","val","varptr","chr$","inkey$", 

"input$","Left$";mid$" 

545data"right$","space$","str$",''string$", 

"CLEAR","LINE",''INPUT#","WIDTH","DSKI$", 

"DSKO$" 

550DATA"AND",''MGTGR","XOR",''EQV","IMP", 

"NOr',"FOR","NEX'r,"STEP","CALL","CGM", 

"ERR","KEY","1VIDM'' 

555DATA"EDir;LGC","SOUND","LOF","POKE", 

"PRESEr',"PSET,"CLOAD",''CSAVEM","CLGSE", 

"STOP","DEFDBL" 

560DATA"DEFINr,"DEFSNG"/'DEFSTR","DIM", 

"APPEND","IF","INPUr,"LINE","CSAVE","INP", 

"IPL","KTLL" 

565DATA"LFILES","CGPY"/'LET,"LOAD", 

"FILES","MENU","MERGE","NA]ME","AS","NEW", 

"ONnME$","OPEN" 

570DATA"OUTPUT","END","PGWER","CGNT", 

"READ","RUNM","RUN","SAVEM",''SAVE", 

"SCREEN","TAN","TIME$ON" 

575DATA"TIME$OFF","TIME$STOP",''TG","OR", 

"OFF";iNT","SIN","ON"."OUT","RETURN",''CLS", 

"BEEP","MOD"/'XXX" 

580 PRINT#2,"VARIABLE NAME ERROR IN 

LINE "LN$;:RESUME432 




^ 



Pages 



TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



TRSCHORD 

Model 4 - Editor Assembler (EDAS) 

by Lance Wolstrup 



Some years ago, before I got hooked on 
computers and the TRS-80 in particular, I made my 
Hving by playing music. By profession I was a bass 
player (electric bass), but I also doubled on trumpet, 
trombone and fluegelhorn, and from time to time I 
would serve as the resident guitar player. Though I 
was not particularly good at it, the guitar was 
always my favorite instrument and I spent more 
time practicing on it than any of the others. But 
when I got out of music to join the businessworld, 
they were all put away and, for the most part, stayed 
out of sight for better than 15 years. 

Now, a generation later, the guitar is again in 
vogue at my house. My two sons, one by one, found 
my old Fender in the garage and visions of becoming 
rock stars inspires them to practice long and loud 
(they also found my 200 watts per channel Fender 
Bassman amp - darn it!). Alan, my oldest, has played 
for a while and is now trying to get a band together. 
Steven is taking lessons from me - I guess that I 
must be cheaper than a real guitar teacher. 

Like other kids his age (15), he hkes heavy metal 
rock with the loud, screaming guitars. Though I am 
not crazy about this kind of music, I must admit that 
some of the guitar players are very good. Steven is 
frustrated that he cannot play the fast licks 
immediately. He is in a hurry, but I keep telling him 
that the secret is knowing and being able to play the 
chords. I think he beheves me, because he is actually 
practicing what I tell him. 

No question about it, knowing chords is the 
secret to improvisation on, not only guitar, but any 
string instrument as well as keyboards. Therefore, 
to help Steven learn and remember the different 
t)T)es of chords available, I fired up my Model 4 and 
began to write a program that would display 4 
guitarnecks and the fingering for 4 inversions of the 
selected chord. I wrote the initial graphics routines 
in Basic, but gave up almost immediately — it was 
just too slow. I decided to write the entire program 
in assembler, so I got out EDAS from Misosys and 
started to code. 

TRSCHORD/CMD begins by displaying two 
menus. The first asks the user to select a chord (C 
through B, including all shanks and flats), and the 
second prompts for the type of chord to display 
(major, minor, 7th, etc). If Esc (Shift-Up Arrow) is 
pressed at either of these prompts, the program will 
move back one step; that is, from the second menu 

TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



prompt back to the first menu prompt, and from the 
first menu prompt back to DOS. Assuming that a 
chord is selected, TRSCHORD will display four 
different ways of playing it. The user is then 
prompted to press ENTER to return to the menus. 
That's all there is to it, but it has proved to be of 
great value to, not only Steven, but also myself. As I 
mentioned earlier, I haven't played seriously for 
many years, so naturally I had forgotten much. 
Having to do the research for this program brought 
back much, and now I have it all available on my 
TRS-80. 



trschord/asm 

for TRS-80 Model 4 

copyright 1995 by Lance Wolstrup 

all rights reserved 



ORG 


3000H 




START LD 


C,15 


;cursor off 


CALL 


DSP 




LD 


A, 105 


;@cls 


RST 


40 




CALL 


NAME 


;display program name 


STARTl CALL 


MENU 


;display menu choices 


LMENU LD 


HL,0F14H 


;height=15,widtli=20 


LD 


(WIDTH),HL 


; store values in buffer 


LD 


HL,050CH 


;cursor@(5,12) 


LD 


DE.BXDATl 


;point to box 


CAI.L 


BOX 


idisplay box 


LMENUl LD 


HL,140FH 


;cursor@(20,15) 


CALL 


LOCATE 


;position cursor 


LD 


HL.ASKCRD 


ipoint to text 


LD 


A,10 


;@dsply 


RST 


40 


;display Hne of text 


LD 


HL,141DH 


;cursor@(20,29) 


LD 


C,2 


;max chrs allowed 


LD 


DE.CHRBUF 


;point to chrbuf 


CALL 


ASK 


;get keystrokes 


CP 


27 


;is it esc 


JR 


Z.EXIT 


;exit if yes 


CALL 


FNDNUM 


;conv keystrokes to 
;number 


CP 


13 


;isit = > 13 


JR 


NC.LMENUl 


;if so - bad input 


LD 


(SELECT),A 


;save chord in buffer 


LD 


HL,050CH 


;vert=5,horiz=12 


LD 


DE,BXDAT2 


;data to erase box 


» CALL 


BOX 


;erase box 


RMENU LD 


HL.OCISH 


;height=12,width=24 



Page 9 



LD 


(\VIDTH),HL , 


store in buffer 


GTYPl 


EX 


DE.HL 


;xfer offset to DE 


LD 


HL,0526H 


cursor@(5,38) 




PUSH 


DE 


;and save it 


LD 


DE.BXDATl 


box data 


J 








CALL 


BOX 


draw box 




CALL 


FRETS 


;go draw guitar necks 


LD 


HL,1129H 


cursor@(17,41) 




POP 


DE 


irestore offset 


CALL 


LOCATE 


position cursor 




CALL 


DGIT 


;go draw chords 


LD 


HL.ASKTYP 


point to text 




LD 


HL,0400H 


;cursor @(4,0) 


LD 


A.IO 


@dsply 




CALL 


LOCATE 


iposition cursor 


RST 


40 


display line of text 




LD 


C,31 


;erase to eod 


LD 


HL.113CH 


cursor@(17,60) 




CALL 


DSP 


; display it 


LD 


C.l 


max=l chr 




JP 


STARTl 


;and start over 


LD 


DE.CHRBUF 


point to receive buffer 


J 








CALL 


ASK 


go get keystroke 


ASKCRD DB 


'Select chord: ',14,3 


CP 


27 


is it escape 


ASKTYP DB 


'Select chord type: ',14,3 


JR 


NZ.GETCRD 


no - so continue 


; 








LD 


HL,113CH 


cursor@(17,60) 


NAME 


LD 


HL,0024H 


;cursor @(0,36) 


CALL 


LOCATE 


position cursor 




CALL 


LOCATE 


iposition cursor 


LD 


C,46 


chr is a period 




LD 


HL.HEADl 


ipoint to prog name 


CALL 


DSP 


display it 




LD 


A.IO 


land display it 


LD 


HL,0526H 


cursor@(5,38) 




RST 


40 




LD 


DE,BXDAT2 


erase box data 




LD 


HL,0111H 


!Cursor@(I,17) 


CALL 


BOX 


erase box 




CAI.L 


LOCATE 


iposition cursor 


JR 

> 


LMENU 


go back to left menu 




LD 
LD 


HL,HEAD2 
A,10 


ipoint to head2 
land display it 


EXIT LD 


A,105 


@cls 




RST 


40 




RST 


40 


clear screen 




LD 


HL,020BH 


Icursor@(2,ll) 


RET 

1 




return to dos 




CALL 
LD 


LOCATE 
HL,HEAD3 


iposition cursor 
ipoint to heads 


GETCRDLD 


HL,0400H 


cursor® (4,0) 




LD 


A,10 


land display it 


CALL 


LOCATE 


position cursor 




RST 


40 




LD 


C.31 


erase from cursor 




LD 


B,80 


lloop counter is 80 


CALL 


DSP 


to end of display 


NAMEl LD 


C,140 


!chr$(140) 


LD 


A,(CHRBUF) 


get number input 




CALL 


DSP 


idraw line across 


SBC 


A,30H 


strip ascii 




DJNZ 


NAMEl 


lentire screen 


LD 


(SELECT+1),A 


and store it 




RET 






LD 


HL.CMAJ 


point to first chord 


1 








LD 


IX.TYPLEN 


point to chord length 


HEADl DB 


'TrsChord',13 




LD 


A, (SELECT) 


check if 


HEAD2 DB 


'a simple guitar 


chord reference ' 


DEC 


A 


input is 1 




DB 


'for the TRS-80' 


,13 


OR 


A 


is it? 


HEAD3 DB 


'Copyright (c) 1995 by Lance ' 


JR 


Z.GETIYP 


yes, so figure type 




DB 


'Wolstrup - All 1 


fights reserved', 13 


LD 


B,A 


get loop counter 


; 








LD 


C,9 


9 chord types 


MENU 


LD 


HL,0400H 


icursor @(4,0) 


XOR 


A 


a=0 




CALL 


LOCATE 


iposition cursor 


CLOOPl ADD 


A,C 


figure 




LD 


C,31 


lerase to eod 


DJNZ 


CLOOPl 


the offset 




CALL 


DSP 


1 display it 


LD 


B,A 


use it as loop counter 




LD 


DE.MMSGl 


ipoint to 1st menu 


CL00P2 LD 


D,0 


;DE will hold 8-bit 




LD 


HL,0712H 


icursor @(7, 18) 






•number 




LD 


B,12 


ll2 menu items 


LD 


E.ax) 


;get chord length 




CALL 


MDSP 


I go display 1st menu 


ADD 


HL.DE 


•and add it to offset 




LD 


HL,072BH 


icursor @(7,43) 


INC 


IX 


;get next length 




LD 


B,9 


|9 menu items 


DJNZ 


CL00P2 


;and repeat 




CAI.L 
RET 


MDSP 


Igo display 2nd menu 


GEl'l'n^ LD 


A,(SELECT+1) 


;get 2nd input 


; 








DEC 


A 


;check to see 


MDSP 


CALL 


LOCATE 


iposition cursor 


OR 


A 


;if it is 1 


MDSPl LD 


A,(DE) 


Iget chr 


JR 


Z.GTYPl 


;if so, jump 




CP 


3 


lis it terminator 


LD 


B,A 


;get loop counter 




JR 


NZ,MDSP2 


ino -jump 


CL00P3 LD 


E.(IX) 


;get Isb 




INC 


DE 


lyes - next menu item 


LD 


D,0 


;msb is always 




INC 


H 


land next vertical line 


ADD 


HL.DE 


;add to offset 




DJNZ 


MDSP 


|do it again 


INC 


IX 


ipoint to next tj^De 




RET 






DJNZ 


CL00P3 


;and repeat 


J 








1 






MDSP2 LD 


C,A 


icopy chr to C 


Paee 10 








TF 


tSTimes magazi 


jie 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 





CALL 


DSP ; 


and display it 1 




INC 


C 


;increment fret# 




INC 


DE ;point to next chr | 




DJNZ 


FRNUMl 


;repeat for 4 frets 




JR 


MDSPl ; 


and do it again 




POP 
LD 


HL 
B,14 


;restor8 cursor pos 
;move cursor 


MMSGIDB 


' 1. C',3 




FINDl 


INC 


L 


;horizontally to the 




DB 


' 2. Db'.S 






DJNZ 


FINDl 


;right 14 positions 




DB 


• 3. D'.3 






CALL 


LOCATE 


iposition cursor 




DB 


• 4. Eb',3 






LD 


(ST1BUF),HL 


;save cursor position 




DB 


' 5. E',3 










;in buffer 




DB 


' 6. F,3 




FIND2 


INC 


DE 


ipoint to next data 




DB 


• 7. Gb',3 






LD 


A,(DE) 


;get data to A 




DB 


'8. G',3 






CP 


255 


;is it terminator 




DB 


' 9. Ab',3 






JR 


Z.ENTER 


;yes -jump 




DB 


'10. A',3 






CP 


254 


;is it next guitar 




DB 


•lLBb',3 






JR 


NZ.NXTFRT 


;no -jump 




DB 


•12. B'.3 






INC 


DE 


;point to next data 


MMSG2DB 


• 1. Major',3 






JR 


DGl 


;and go do it again 




DB 


• 2. Minor',3 




; 










DB 


' 3. 6th',3 




NXTFRT CP 


253 


;is it next fret 




DB 


•4.Minor6tli',3 






JR 


NZ,FIND3 


;no -jump 




DB 


• 5. 7th',3 






LD 


HL,(ST1BUF) 


;get cursor position 




DB 


• 6. Minor 7th',3 






INC 


H 


;move cursor 




DB 


• 7. Major 7th',3 






INC 


H 


;down 2 lines 




DB 


• 8. 9th',3 






LD 


(ST1BUF),HL 


;save new cursor pos 




DB 


• 9. Minor 9th',3 






.JR 


FIND2 


;and repeat 


DGIT 


LD 


HL,0605H ; 


cursor @(6,5) 


FIND3 


CP 


252 


;is it x 




CALL 


LOCATE ; 


position cursor 




JR 


NZ,FIND4 


;no - jump 


DGO 


LD 


A,(DE) 


get chr in chord name 


PUTX 


LD 


HL,(ST1BUF) 


;get cursor position 




INC 


DE 


point to next chr 




LD 


H,8 


;cursor to line 8 




CP 


13 


is it terminator 




INC 


DE 


;next data 




JR 


Z.DGl 


yes - jump 




LD 


A.(DE) 


;xfer to A 




LD 


C,A 


no - copy chr to C 




CP 


255 


;is it guitar end 




CAI.L 


DSP 


and display it 




.JR 


Z.ENTER 


;yes - jump 




JR 


DGO 


repeat 




CP 


254 


;is it next guitar 


DGl 


LD 


B.4 


4 guitars 




JR 


NZ.Xl 


;no -jump 




LD 


HL,0A3EH 


cursor @(10,62) 




INC 


DE 


;yes - so point to 


DGITl 


LD 


A,(DE) 


get guitar number 








;next data 




CP 


B 


is it last guitar 




JP 


DGl 


;and repeat 




JR 


Z.FRNUM 


jump if yes 


; 








DGIT2 


LD 


A,L 


get horiz cursor 


XI 


LD 


B,A 


;data to loop counter 








position to A 


X2 


DEC 


L 


;move cusor 2 spaces 




LD 


C,19 


19 pos to previous 




DEC 


L 


;to the left 




SBC 


A,C 


calculate new cursor 




DJNZ 


X2 


;repeat 




LD 


L,A 


position - xfer to L 




INC 


L 


;move cursor 1 space 




DJNZ 


DGITl 






CALL 


LOCATE 


;to the right 

;and position cursor 


FRNUM INC 


DE 


get fret number 




LD 


C,120 


; display 'x' 




PUSH 


HL 


save cursor pos 




CALL 


DSP 






LD 


A,(DE) 


number to A 




JR 


PUTX 


;and repeat 




LD 


C,A 


xfer fret# to C 


1 










LD 


B,4 


need to display 4 frets 


FIND4 


LD 


HL,(ST1BUF) 


;get cursor position 


FRNUMl CALLLOCATE 


position cursor 




LD 


B,A 


;data to loop counter 




PUSH 


BC 


save loop & fret# 


FINDS 


DEC 


L 


;move cursor 2 spaces 




CALL 


GETNUM 


go convert number 




DEC 


L 


;to the left 








to ascii 




DJNZ 


FINDS 


;repeat 




LD 


A,(NUMBUF) 


get 10s digit in ascii 


; 










LD 


C,A 


;copy it to C 




CALL 


LOCATE 


;position cursor 




CALL 


DSP 


;and display it 




LD 


0,1 30 


;finger position is 




LD 


A,(NUMBUF+1) 


;get Is digit in ascii 




CALL 


DSP 


;diplayed by using 




LD 


C,A 


;copy it to C 




LD 


0,151 


;chr(130) & chr(151) 




CALL 


DSP 


;and display it 




CALL 


DSP 






POP 


BC 


;restore loop & fret# 




JR 


FIND2 


;and repeat 




INC 


H 


;move cursor down 


; 










INC 


H 


;2 lines 


ENTER LD 


HL,141CH 


;cursor @(20,28) 



TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



Page 11 



CALL 


LOCATE 


iposition cursor 


LD 


B.6 ;] 


oop counter 


LD 


HL.ENTMSG 


;point to message 


FRETS6 LD 


C,149 ; 


draw the 


LD 


A.IO 


;and display it 


CALL 


DSP ; 


2nd half 


RST 


40 




LD 


C,32 ; 


af the 


ENTl LD 


A,l 


;get keystroke 


CALL 


DSP ; 


fret 


RST 


40 




DJNZ 


FRETS6 




CP 


13 


;is it enter 


POP 


BC ; 


restore loop counter 


JR 


NZ.ENTl 


;no -jump 


INC 


H ; 


move cursor 


LD 


C,15 


;yes - turn off cursor 


CALL 


LOCATE ; 


down one line 


CALL 


DSP 




DJNZ 


FRETS4 ; 


and repeat 


RET 






RET 






ENTMSG DB 


'Press ENTER for menu ',14,03 


BOX PUSH 


DE 










PUSH 


BC 




GETNUM LD 


A,C 


;copy number to A 


CALL 


LOCATE ; 


position cursor 


CP 


10 


;is it 10 


LD 


A.(DE) ; 


get top left chr 


JR 


NC.GETNMl 


;jump if smaller 


LD 


C,A ; 


copy to C 


LD 


A,32 


;store a space 


CALL 


DSP ; 


display it 


LD 


(NUMBUF),A 


;in buffer 


LD 


A,(WIDTH) ; 


get box width 


LD 


A,C 


;copy number to A 


LD 


B.A ; 


xfer to B 


ADD 


A,30H 


;make it ascii 


INC 


DE ; 


next chr 


GETNMO LD 


(NUMBUF+1),A ;and store it | 


LD 


A,(DE) ; 


get top chr 


RET 






LD 


C.A ; 


copy to C 








BOXl CALL 


DSP ; 


display chr 


GETNMl LD 


A,31H 


;ascii T 


DJNZ 


BOXl ; 


repeat top width 


LD 


(NUMBUF).A 


;store in buffer 


INC 


DE ; 


point to next chr 


LD 


A,C 


;copy number to A 


LD 


A,(DE) ; 


get top right chr 


SBC 


A,10 


;find Is digit 


LD 


C.A ; 


copy to C 


ADD 


A,30H 


;and make it ascii 


CALL 


DSP 


display it 


JR 


GETNMO 


;go store it 


LD 


A,(HEIGTH) 


get vertical loop 








LD 


B.A 


xfer to B 


FRETS LD 


HL,0905H 


;cursor @(9,5) 


INC 


DE 


next chr 


LD 


B,2 


;loop counter 


LD 


A,(DE) 


get vertical left chr 


FRETSl PUSH 


BC 


;save loop counter 


LD 


C.A 


copy to C 


PUSH 


HL 


;save cursor position 


B0X2 INC 


H 


next vert cursor pos 


LD 


B,4 


;loop 4 guitars necks 


CALL 


LOCATE 


position cursor 


FRETS2 PUSH BC 


;save loop counter 


CALL 


DSP 


display chr 


PUSH 


HL 


;save cursor position 


DJNZ 


B0X2 


repeat for height 


CALL 


LOCATE 


;position cursor 


INC 


DE 


point to next chr 


CALL 


FRETS3 


;go draw guitar necks 


LD 


A,(DE) 


get bottom left chr 


POP 


HL 


;restore cursor position 


LD 


C,A 


copy to C 


LD 


A.L 


;horizontal cursor 


INC 


H 


next vert cursor pos 






iposition to A 


CALL 


LOCATE 


Dosition cursor 


LD 


B,20 


;move cursor 


CALL 


DSP 


;display chr 


ADD 


A,B 


;20 positions to 


LD 


A,(WIDTH) 


;get box width 


LD 


L.A 


;the right 


LD 


B,A 


;xfer to B 


POP 


BC 


;restore loop counter 


INC 


DE 


;next chr 


DJNZ 


FRETS2 


;repeat 


LD 


A,(DE) 


;get bottom chr 


POP 


HL 


;restore cursor position 


LD 


C,A 


;xfer to C 


POP 


BC 


;restore loop counter 


B0X3 INC 


L 


;next cursor pos 


DJNZ 


FRETSl 


;repeat 


CALL 


LOCATE 


iposition cursor 


RET 






CALL 


DSP 


{display chr 








DJNZ 


B0X3 


;repeat for width 


]FRETS3 LD 


B,4 


;loop counter 


INC 


L 


;next cursor pos 


FRETS4 PUSH BC 


;save loop counter 


CALL 


LOCATE 


iposition cursor 


LD 


B,5 


;new loop counter 


INC 


DE 


inext chr 


FRETS5 LD 


C,151 


;draw 


LD 


A,(DE) 


Iget bottom right chr 


CALL 


DSP 


;E,A,D,G,B 


LD 


C,A 


ixfer to C 


LD 


C,131 


Iguitar 


CALL 


DSP 


[display chr 


CALL 


DSP 


;strings 


LD 


A,(HEIGTH) 


Iget box heigth 


DJNZ 


FRETS5 


;in one fret 


LD 


B,A 


ixfer to B 


LD 


C,149 


;draw E string 


INC 


DE 


inext chr 


CALL 


DSP 




LD 


A,(DE) 


Iget right chr 


INC 


H 


;next fret 


LD 


C.A 


ixfer to C 


CALL 

Pnap 19 


LOCATE 


;position cursor 


B0X4 DEC 
T] 


H 
^Times magaziri 


|dec vertical cursor pos 
e 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



CALL LOCATE 

CALL DSP 

DJNZ B0X4 

POP BC 

POP DE 
RET 



;position cursor 
;display chr 
;repeat for heigth 



BXDATl DB 
BXDAT2 DB 
WIDTH DB 
HEIGTH DB 

ASK CALL 
LD 

PUSH 
LD 
LD 

DSPMAX CALL 
DJNZ 
POP 

ASKO CALL 
CALL 
CP 
RET 
CP 
JR 
LD 
OR 
RET 
JR 

ASKl CP 
JR 
LD 
OR 
JR 
DEC 
CALL 
PUSH 
LD 
CALL 
POP 
DEC 
DEC 
JR 



151,131,171.149,181,176,186,170 

32,32,32,32,32,32,32,32 







ASI^ 



PUSH 

LD 

LD 

CP 

LD 

POP 

JR 

CP 

JR 

CP 

tJR 

PUSH 

LD 

CAI.L 

POP 

INC 

INC 

LD 



LOCATE 

B.O 

BC 

B.C 

C,46 

DSP 

DSPMAX 

BC 

LOCATE 

INKEY 

27 

Z 

13 

NZ,ASK1 

A,B 

A 

NZ 

ASKO 

8 

NZ,ASK2 

A,B 

A 

Z,ASKO 

L 

LOCATE 

BC 

C,46 

DSP 

BC 

B 

DE 

ASKO 

DE 

E,A 

A,B 

C 

A,E 

DE 

NCASKO 

30H 

C,ASKO 

3AH 

NC.ASKO 

BC 

C,A 

DSP 

BC 

L 

B 

(DE),A 



position cursor 

chr count is 

save it 

get max chr count 

chr is period 

display 

periods 

restore chr count 

position cursor 

get chr 

is it esc? 

yes - return 

no - is it enter? 

no -jump 

chr count to a 

isitO 

return if not 

must have input 

is it backspace 

no-jump 

get chr counter 

isitO 

no backspace if chrs 

previous cursor pos 

position cursor 

save chr count 

replace chr with 

a period 

restore chr count 

sub from chr counter 

dec chrbuf 

repeat 

save chrbuf 

save chr in E 

get chr count 

have we reached max 

chr back to A 

restore chrbuf 

already at max 

;is it 

jump if smaller 

is 9+1 

jump if = or > 

save chr count 

& max count 

xfer chr to C 

display it 

restore chr count 

move cursor 

bump chr count 

store keystroke in 

chrbuf 



INC DE 
JR ASKO 

FNDNUM LD A,B 



CP 
LD 
LD 
JR 

LD 
SBC 
ADD 
LD 
ADD 
ADD 
ADD 
LD 
INC 
FNUMl LD 
SBC 
ADD 
RET 



1 

B,0 

DE,CHRBUF 

Z,FNUM1 

A,(DE) 

A,30H 

A,A 

B,A 

A,A 

A,A 

A,B 

B,A 

DE 

A,(DE) 

A,30H 

A,B 



;point to next 
;address in chrbuf 
;repeat 

get number 
of digits 
;is it 1? 

assume 10s digit is 
point to chrbuf 
ijump if only 
1 keystroke 
get chr input 
and strip ascii 
multiply by 2 
save result 
now multiplied 4x 
now multiplied 8x 
now lOx 
;copy to B 
point to next input 
get Is digit 
: strip ascii 
and add 10s 



;@key - get keystroke 
;get chr 



;@dsp - display chr 



;@vdctl 
iposition cursor 



INKEY PUSH DE 

LD A,l 

RST 40 

POP DE 
RET 

DSP PUSH DE 

LD A,2 

RST 40 

POP DE 
RET 

LOCATE PUSHBC 

PUSH DE 

PUSH HL 

LD A,15 

LD B,3 

RST 40 

POP HL 

POP DE 

POP BC 
RET 



CMAJ DB •C',13 

DB 1,1,2,253,4.253,5,254 

DB 2,3, 1 ,2,3,4,5,6,253,253,2,3,4,254 

DB 3,5,2,3,4,253,253,5,253,6,252,1,254 

DB 4,8,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253,4,5,255 

CMIN DB 'CmM3 

DB 1,3,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,2,253,3,4,254 

DB 2,8,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,253,4,5,254 

DB 3,3,5,253,2,253,3,4,252,1,6,254 

DB 4,5,3,4,253,5,253,253,6,252,1,2,255 

C6 DB 'Ce'.lS 

DB 1,1,2,253,3,4,253,5,254 

DB 2,2,3,253,5,253,253,2,4,254 

DB 3,8,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253,2,5,254 

DB 4,9,3,253,2,4,5,252,1,6,255 



TRSTlmes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



Page 13 



CMIN6 DB 'Cm6M3 

DB 1,1,2,4,253,3,253,6,252,5,254 

DB 2,4,2,253,3,4,6,252,5,254 

DB 3,7,4,253,2,3,6,252,5,254 

DB 4,10,2,4,253,6,253,3,252,5,255 

C7 DB •C7M3 

DB 1,1,2,253,4,253,3,5,254 

DB 2,5,2,3,4,253,1,252,5,6,254 

DB 3,5,2,3,4,253,6,252,5,254 

DB 4,8,1,2.3,4,5,6,253,3,253,5,255 

CMIN7 DB 'Cm7M3 

DB 1,1,1,2,3,4,253,253,1,3,252,5,6,254 

DB 2,3,1,3,5,253,2,252,4,6,254 

DB 3,5,3,253,5,253,253,2,4,252,1,6,254 

DB 4,8,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,253,5,255 

CMAJ7 DB 'Cmaj7M3 

DB 1,1,253,4,253,5,254 

DB 2,3,1,2,3,4,5,253,3,253,2,4,254 

DB 3,5,2,3,4,253,253,1,252,5,6,254 

DB 4,7,1,253,2,253,3,253,4,252,5,6,255 

C9 DB 'C9M3 

DB 1,2,4,253,1,2,3,5,6,254 

DB 2,5,2,3,4,253,6,253,3,252,5,254 

DB 3,7,3,5,253,2,4,254 

DB 4,9,3,253,1,5,253,2,252,4,255 

CMIN9 DB 'Cm9M3 

DB 1,1,4,253,253,1,2,3,5,6,254 

DB 2,4,2,253,4,253,1,253,3,252,5,254 

DB 3,6,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253,2,4,254 

DB 4,8,2,3,4,253,253,6,252,5,255 

DBMAJDB 'DbM3 

DB 1,1,1,2,3,253,2,253,4,254 

DB 2,4,1,253,2,3,4,254 

DB 3,6,2,3,4,253,253,5,253,6,254 

DB 4,9,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253,4,5,255 

DBMINDB 'DbmM3 

DB 1,1,3,253,2,4,253,253,1,254 

DB 2,4,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,2,253,3,4,254 

DB 3,6,3,4,253,5,253,253,6,254 

DB 4,9,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,253,4,5,255 

DBe DB •Db6M3 

DB 1,1,1,3,5,253,2,252,4,254 

DB 2,2,2,253,3,4,253,1,254 

DB 3,6,1,2,3,4,254 

DB 4,9,1 ,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253,2,5,255 

DBMINe DB 'Dbm6',13 

DB 1,1,3,5,253,2,4,254 

DB 2,3,3,253,1,5,253,2,252,4,254 

DB 3,5,2,253,3,4,6,252,5,254 

DB 4,8,4,253,2.3,6,252.5,255 

067 DB •Db7M3 

DB 1,1,3,253,2,5,253,4,254 

DB 2,4,3,4,5,253,253,2,4,254 

DB 3,6,2,3,4,253,6,252,5,254 



DB 4,9,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253,5,255 



DBMIN7 DB 


'Obm7M3 




DB 


1,1,3,253,2,4,5,254 




DB 


2,2,2,3,4,253,253,3,6,252,5,254 




OB 


3,5,2,253,3,4,253,6,252,5,254 




OB 


4,9,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,253,5,255 


bBMAJ7 DB 


'Dbmaj7M3 




OB 


1,1,1,2,3,253,253,4,253,5,254 




DB 


2,4,1,2,3,4,5,253,3,253,2,4,254 




DB 


3,6,2,3,4,253,253,6,252,5,254 




DB 


4,8,1,253,2,253,3,253,4,255 


069 


DB 


•Ob9',13 




DB 


1,3,4,253,1,2,3,6,252,5,254 




DB 


2,6,2.3,4,253,6,253,3,252,5,254 




DB 


3,6,2,253,253,3,253,4,6,252,5,254 




DB 


4,8,3,5,253,2,4,255 


bBMIN9 OB 


•Dbm9M3 




OB 


1,1,3,4,253,2,5,254 




DB 


2,2,4,253,253,2,3,5,254 




DB 


3,4,2,3,253,253,4,253,5,254 




DB 


4,9,2,3,4,253,253,6,252,5,255 


DMAJ 


DB 


•DM3 




OB 


1,2,1,3,253,2,254 




DB 


2,2,3,253,2,253,4,253,5,254 




OB 


3,7,2,3,4,253,253,5,253,6,254 




OB 


4,10,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253,4,5,255 


DMIN 


OB 


'DmM3 




OB 


1,1,1,253,3,253,2,4,254 




OB 


2,2,3,253,2,4,253,253,5,254 




OB 


3,5,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,2,253,3,4,254 




OB 


4,10,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,253,4,5,255 


06 


OB 


•D6',13 




DB 


1,3,2,253,3,4,253,1,254 




DB 


2,2,3,4,5,253,2,253,4,254 




OB 


3,7,2,3,4,6,252,5,254 




DB 


4,10,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253,2,5,255 


bMIN6 DB 


•Dm6',13 




OB 


1,2,3,5,253,2,4,254 




OB 


2,3,2,3,4,253,3,253,6,252,5,254 




DB 


3,7,4,253,2,3,6,252,5,254 




OB 


4,10,3,253,253,2,4,5,255 


07 


OB 


'07', 13 




DB 


1,1,2,253,1,3,254 




DB 


2,3,2,253,4,253,3,5,254 




DB 


3,7,2,3,4,253,6,252,5,254 




DB 


4,10,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253,5,255 


bMIN7 DB 


'Om7M3 




DB 


1,2,3,253,2,4,5,254 




DB 


2,3,2,3,4,253,1,3,254 




DB 


3,5,1,3,5,253,2,252,4,254 




OB 


4,10,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,253,5,255 


bMAJ7 DB 


•Omaj7',13 




OB 


1,2,1 ,2,3,253,253,4,253,5,254 




OB 


2,5,1.2,3,4,5,6.253,3,253,2,4,254 



Page 14 



TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



DB 


3,7,2,3,4.253,253,6,252,5,254 




DB 


DB 


4,9,253,1,253,2,253,3,253,4,255 




DB 
DB 


09 DB 


'D9M3 






DB 


1,1,2,253,3,4,6,252,5,254 


EMAJ 


DB 


DB 


2,4,4,253,1,2,3,6,252,5,254 




DB 


DB 


3,7,2,3,4,253,6,253,3,252,5,254 




DB 


DB 


4,9,3,5,253,2,4,255 




DB 
DB 


DMINS DB 


'Dm9M3 


J 




DB 


1,1,2,6,253,3,4,252,5,254 


EMIN 


DB 


DB 


2,3,4,253,253,2,3,5,254 




DB 


DB 


3,5,2,3,253,253,4,253,5,254 




DB 


DB 


4,10,2,3,4,253,253,6,252,5,255 




DB 
DB 


EBMAJ DB 


'Eb',13 


1 




DB 


1,3,2,253,2,253,4,253,5,254 


E6 


DB 


DB 


2,6,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,253,2,3,4,254 




DB 


DB 


3,8,2,3,4,253,253,5,253,6,254 




DB 


DB 


4,11,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253,4,5,255 




DB 
DB 


EBMIN DB 


•EbmM3 


1 




DB 


1,2,1,253,3,253,2,4,254 


EMIN6 


DB 


DB 


2,3,3,253,2,4,253,253,5,254 




DB 


DB 


3,6,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,2,253,3,4,254 




DB 


DB 


4,11,1,2,3.4,5,6,253,253,4,5,255 




DB 
DB 


EB6 DB 


'Eb6',13 


» 




DB 


1,1,2,3,4,253,253,3,6,252,5,254 


E7 


DB 


DB 


2,4,2,253,3,4,253,6,252,5,254 




DB 


DB 


3,8,2,3,4,6,252,5,254 




DB 


DB 


4,10,4,253,2,6,253,3,255 




DB 
DB 


EBMIN6 DB 


'Ebm6',13 


1 




DB 


1,1,2,3,4,253,6,253,3,252,5,254 


EMIN7 


' DB 


DB 


2,3,3,5,253,2,4,254 




DB 


DB 


3,4,2,3,4,253,3,253,6,252,5,254 




DB 


DB 


4,10,4,253.2,3,6,252,5,255 




DB 
DB 


EB7 DB 


'Eb7M3 


) 




DB 


1,1,4,253,2.253.3,6,252,5,254 


EMAJ7 DB 


DB 


2,4,2.253,4,253,3,5,254 




DB 


DB 


3,8.2,3.4,253,6,252,5,254 




DB 


DB 


4,11.1.2.3.4,5,6,253,3,253,5,255 




DB 
DB 


EBMIN7 DB 


'Ebm7M3 


; 




DB 


1,1,4,253,2,6,253,3,252,5.254 


E9 


DB 


DB 


2.4.2,3.4.253.253.3.6.252,5,254 




DB 


DB 


3,6,3,4,5,253.2,253,4,254 




DB 


DB 


4,11,1,2.3,4,5,6,253,253,5,255 




DB 
DB 


EBMAJ7 DB 


•Ebmaj7',13 


I 




DB 


1,3,1,2,3,253,253,4,253,5,254 


EMIN9 DB 


DB 


2,6,1,2.3,4,5,6,253,3,253,2,4,254 




DB 


DB 


3,8,2,3,4.253.253,5.6.254 




DB 


DB 


4.11.2,3.6.253.4,252,5,255 




DB 
DB 


EB9 DB 


•Eb9M3 


; 




DB 


1.2.1,253,2,253,3,253,4,254 


FMAJ 


DB 


DB 


2,3,2,6,253,3,4,252,5.254 




DB 


DB 


3,5.4.253.253,2,3.6.252,5,254 




DB 


DB 


4,7,2,3,253.253,4,253,5,255 




DB 
DB 


EBMIN9 DB 


•Ebm9M3 


; 


JL-'JL/ 


DB 


1,1,1,253,2,253.3.253,4,254 


FMIN 


DB 



2,2,2,6,253,3,4.252,5,254 

3.4,4,253.253,2.3.5.254 

4,6.2.3.253,253,4,253,5,255 

'EM3 

1,1,3,253,4,5,254 

2,4,3,253,2,253,4,253.5.254 

3,7,1,2,3,4,5.6.253.253,2,3,4,254 

4,9.2.3.4,253,253,5,253,6,255 

'Em',13 

1,1,253,4,5,254 

2,3,1,253.3.253.2,4,254 

3.4,3,253,2,4,253.253,5,254 

4,7,1,2,3,4,5,6,253.2.253.3.4.255 

•E6M3 

1.1,3,253.2,4,5.254 

2.2,2,3.4.253,253.3,6,252.5,254 

3.5,2.253.3.4.253,6,252,5,254 

4,9.1,2.3,4.255 

'Em6',13 

1,1.253.2.4.5.254 

2.2,2,3,4,253,6,253,3.254 

3,4,3,5,253,2.4.254 

4,5,2,3,4,253,3,253,6,252,5,255 

•E7',13 

1,1,3,253.5,254 

2,2,4,253.2.253,3.6,252,5.254 

3.5.2,253,4,253.3,5,254 

4,9,2,3,4.253,6.252,5,255 

'Em7',13 

1,1,253,4,5,253.2,254 

2,4,3.253.2,4,5,254 

3,5,2,3,4,253,253,3,6.252,5.254 

4,7.3,4,5,253.2,253,4,255 

'Emaj7',13 

1,1,3,4.254 

2.2,4,253,253,2.3,6,252,5,254 

3,4,2.3.253,253,4,253,5,254 

4,7,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253,2,4,255 

•E9',13 

1,1,3,253,1,5,253,2,252,4,254 

2,3,2,253,3,4,6,252,5,254 

3.6.4.253.1.2.3,6.252.5.254 

4,9,2,3,4,253,6,253,3.252.5,255 

'Em9M3 

1,2,1,253,2.253.3,253,4,254 

2,3,2,6,253,3,4,252,5,254 

3,5,4,253.253.2.3,5.254 

4.7.2.3,253,253,4,253,5,255 

•FM3 

1,1,1,2,3,4.5.6.253.3.253.4.5.254 

2.5.3.253,2,253.4,253,5,254 

3,8,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,253,2,3,4,254 

4,10,2,3,4.253.253.5.253.6,255 

•FmM3 



TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



Page 15 



F6 



FMIN6 



F7 



DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 

DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 

DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 

DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 



FMIN7 DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 

FMAJ7 DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 



F9 



DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 



FMIN9 DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 

GBMA.JDB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 

GBMIN DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 



GB6 



DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 



1.1,1,2,3.4.5,6,253,253,4.5 254 
2,4,1,253,3,253,2,4,254 
3,5,3,253,2.4,253,253,5,254 
-1.8,1,2.3.4,5,6,253,2.253,3.4,255 

'F6M3 

1.1.1.2,3,4,5.6.253.2.3,253.2.5,254 

2,3.2.3.4.253.253.3.6.252.5.254 

3,2,3,253.2.4,5,254 

4,6,2,253,3,4,253.6,252.5.255 

•Fm6',13 

1,1,4.253.253,2,3,5,254 

2.3,2,3,4,253,6.253.3.252.5 254 

3,6,2,3,4.253.3.253.6,252.5,254 
4.5,3,5,253,2,4.255 

'F7'.13 

1.1,1,2.3.4,5,6,253.3,253,5,254 
2,3,4.253.2.4.253,4.252.5,254 
3,6,2,253,4,253,3,5,254 
4,10,2.3,4,253,6,252,5.255 

•Fm7M3 

1.1.1.2.3,4.5,6,253,253,5,254 
2.3,4.253.2,6,253,3,252.5,254 
3,6,2.3.4.253.253,3,6,252,5,254 
4,9,2.253,3.4.253,6.252.5.255 

'Fmaj7M3 

1,1.2,253,3.253,4,254 

2.5.1,2,3,253,4,253.5,254 

3.8,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253,2,4,254 

4,10,2,3.4.253,253,6,252,5,255 

'F9M3 

1,2,3,253,1.5,253,2,252.5,254 

2,1,2,3.4.253,3,253,6,252.5.254 
3.4,2,253,1.3.4.254 

4,7,4,253,1,2,3.253,6,252,5,255 

•Fm9M3 

1.3,1,253,2,253.3.253,4.254 
2,8,1,2.3,253,253,4,253,5.254 
3,4,2,6,253.3.4,252.5,254 
4,6,4,253,253,2.3.6.252.5.255 

•DbM3 

1.2,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253,4,5,254 
2,6,3,253,2,253,4,253,5,254 
3,9,1.2.3,4,5,6,253,253,2,3,4,254 
4,4,4,253,253,3,6,253,2,252,5,255 

'GbmM3 

1.2,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,253,4.5,254 
2,5,1,253,3,253,2,4.254 

3,9.1.2.3,4.5.6.253.2,253,3,4,254 
4,6,3.253,2.4.253.253,5.255 

•Gb6'.13 

1.2,1.2.3.4.5.6.253,3.253.2,5.254 
2.4,2,3,4.253.253.3,6.252.5,254 
3.7.2,253,3,4,253,6,252,5.254 
4.11,2.3,4,6,252,5,255 



GBMIN6 DB 

DB 

DB 

DB 

DB 



GB7 



DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 



GBMIN7 DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 

f 

GBMAJ7 DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 



GB9 



DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 



GBMIN9 DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 

GMAJ DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 

GMIN DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 



G6 



DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 



GMIN6 DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 



G7 



DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 



Page 16 



'Gbm6M3 

1.4,2,3,4,253,1.253.3,254 

2,2.3.253.253.2.4.5.254 

3,6.3.5,253.2.4.254 

4,1,4,253,2.3.6.252.5,255 

•Gb7M3 

1.2,1,2,3.4,5.6,253,3.253.5,254 
2,7,2,253,4.253,3,5.254 
3.11,2,3,4,253,6,252,5,254 
4.6,3,253.2.5,253,4,255 

'Gbm7M3 

1,2,1,2,3,4.5.6.253.253.5.254 
2.6.3,253,2.4,5,254 

3,7,2,3,4,253.253.3.6.252,5,254 
4,4,4,253,2,6,253,3,255 

•Gbmaj7M3 

1.1,1,253,2.253,3,253,4,254 
2,2,2,6,253,3,4,252,5.254 
3,6,1.2,3.253.253.4.253,5.254 
4,9,1,2,3,4,5,6.253,3,253.2.4.255 

'Gb9M3 

1,1,3,5,253,1.2.4.254 
2,3,3,253,1,5.253,2.252.4 254 
3.5.2.253.3.4.6.252.5,254 
4,8.3,253,1,2.3.6,252,5,255 

'Gbm9M3 

1,4,1,253,2.253,3.253.4.254 

2,2.3.253.253.1.5.253,2,252.4,254 

3,7.4,253.253.2.3,6.252.5.254 

4,9,2.3.253.253.4.253.5.255 

•GM3 
1.2,5.253,1,6.254 

2,3,1.2,3.4.5,6.253,3,253,4,5,254 

3.7,3.253.2.253,4.253,5.254 

4,10.1,2.3.4.5.6,253.253.2.3.4.255 

'Gm'.13 

1,3.1.2.3,4.5,6.253.253,4,5.254 
2,6.1.253,3.253.2,4.254 

f'f;l'2'3 4-5.6.253.2.253.3.4.254 
4,5.4.253.6,253.3.253.2,252.5.255 

•G6M3 

1.3.1.2.3.4,5,6,253,3,253,2,5.254 
2,5,2,3.4.253.253.1,3.254 
3.4.3.253,2.4.5,254 
4.7,3,4,5.253,2,253,4,255 

'Gm6M3 

1,3,3,253,253.2,4.5.254 
2,7.3.5.253.2.4.254 
3,2.3.253,2,3,6,252,5,254 
4,8,2.3.4.253,3,253.6.255 

•G7M3 
1.1,1,253.5.253.6.254 

2.3,1.2.3.4.5.6.253.3.253.5.254 

3,8,2,253.4.253.3.5.254 

4.5,4,253.2.253,3,6.252.5.255 



TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



GMIN7 DB 


•Gm7M3 


DB 


1,3,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,253,5,254 


DB 


2,5,4,253,2,6,253,3,252,5,254 


DB 


3,8,2,3,4,253,253,3,6,252,5,254 


DB 


4,10,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,2,253,4,255 


GMAJ7 DB 


'Gmaj7M3 


DB 


1,2,1,253,2,253,3,253,4,254 


DB 


2,3,2,6,253,3,4,252,5,254 


DB 


3,5,4,253,253,2,3,6,252,5,254 


DB 


4,7,1,2,3.253,4,253,5,255 


G9 DB 


'G9',13 


DB 


1,2,3,5,253,2,4,254 


DB 


2,3,2,3,4,253,3,253,6,252,5,254 


DB 


3,6,2,253,3,4,6,252,5,254 


DB 


4,9,4,253,2,3,6,252,5,255 


GMIN9 DB 


'Gm9',13 


DB 


1,1,5,253,3,253,2,4,254 


DB 


2,5,1,253,2,253,3,253,4,254 


DB 


3,6,2,6,253,3,4,252,5,254 


DB 


4,8,4,253,253,2,3,6,252,5,255 


ABMAJDB 


•AbM3 


DB 


1,4,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253,4,5,254 


DB 


2,1,2,3,4,253,253,5,253,6,254 


DB 


3,8,3,253,2,253.4,253,5,254 


DB 


4,6,4,253,253,3,5,253,2,252,5,255 


ABMIN DB 


'AbmM3 


DB 


1,4,1,2.3,4,5,6,253,253,4,5,254 


DB 


2,7.1,253.3,253,2,4,254 


DB 


3,8,3,253,2,4.253.253.5,254 


DB 


4.1.2,3,4,5,6,253.2.253,3,4,255 


AB6 DB 


•Ab6M3 


DB 


1,5.3.253,2,4,5,254 


DB 


2,3,4,253,2,6,253,3,252,5,254 


DB 


3,6,2,3,4,253,253,3,6,252,5,254 


DB 


4,9,2,253,3.4.253.6.252.5.255 


ABMIN6 DB 


•Abm6M3 


DB 


1,3,4,253,2,3.6.252.5.254 


DB 


2.4.3,253,253,2,3,6,252,5,254 


DB 


3,8,3,5,253,2,4,254 


DB 


4,9,2,3,4,253,3,253,6.252,5,255 


AB7 DB 


•Ab7',13 


DB 


1,1,2,3,4,253,6,252,5,254 


DB 


2,4,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253,5,254 


DB 


3,8,3,253,2,5.253.4.254 


DB 


4.9.253,4,253,3,5,255 


ABMIN7 DB 


'Abm7',13 


DB 


1.4.1,2.3.4,5,6,253,253,5,254 


DB 


2,6,4,253.2,6,253,3,252,5,254 


DB 


3,9,2,3,4,253,253,3,6,252,5,254 


DB 


4,8,3,253,2,4,5,255 


ABMAJ7 DB 


•Abmaj7',13 


DB 


1,3,1,253,2,253,3,253,4,254 


DB 


2,1,2,3,4,253,253,6,252,5,254 


DB 


3,4,2,6,253,3,4,252,5,254 


TRSTimes m 


agazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



DB 



4,8,1.2,3,253,253,4,253,5,255 



AB9 DB 


•Ab9M3 


DB 


1.3,3,5,253,2.4,254 


DB 


2,1,2,3,4,253,6,253,3,252,5,254 


DB 


3.7.2.253,3.4.6.252.5,254 


DB 


4,10,4,253,2,3,6,252,5,255 


ABMIN9 DB 


•Abm9M3 


DB 


1,6.1.253,2,253,3,253,4,254 


DB 


2.7,2.6.253.3,4.252,5,254 


DB 


3,9,4.253.2.53,2,3,6,252,5,254 


DB 


4,2,5,253,3,253,2.4.255 


AMAJ DB 


'AM 3 


DB 


1 ,2,2,3,4,253.253.5.253,6.254 


DB 


2.5,1,2,3.4.5,6,253.3,253.4.5,254 


DB 


3,9,3,253,2,253,4,253,5,254 


DB 


4,7.4.253.253.3,6.253.2.252.5,255 


AMIN DB 


'Am',13 


DB 


1,1,2,253,3,4,254 


DB 


2.5,1,2,3.4,5,6,253.253,4,5,254 


DB 


3,8.1,253.3.253,2,4,254 


DB 


4.7,4,253.6.253,3,253,2,252,5,255 


A6 DB 


•A6',13 


DB 


1,4,4,253,2,6.253.3,252,5,254 


DB 


2,6,3,253,2,4,5,254 


DB 


3,7,2.3,4,253,253,3,6,252,5,254 


DB 


4,10,2,253,3.4,253.6.252.5.255 


AMIN6 DB 


•Am6',13 


DB 


1,1.2.253.1,3,4,254 


DB 


2.5,3,253,253,2,4.5.254 


DB 


3,9.3.5.253,2.4,254 


DB 


4,4,4,253,2,3,6,252,5,255 


A7 DB 


'A7M3 


DB 


1.2.2.3.4.253,6.254 


DB 


2.5,1.2.3.4,5,6,253,3,253.5.254 


DB 


3.10,2.253.4.253.3,5,254 


DB 


4,7,4,253,2,253,3,6,252,5,255 


AMIN7 DB 


'Am7'.13 


DB 


1,1,2,253,4,254 


DB 


2,5.1.2.3.4.5.6.253.253.5.254 


DB 


3.9.3.253.2.4,5,254 


DB 


4,10.2.3.4.253.253.3,6.252,5,255 


AMAJ7 DB 


'Amaj7',13 


DB 


1,1,3,253,2,4,254 


DB 


2,2,2,3.4,253.253.6.252.5.254 


DB 


3.4.1.253.2.253.3.253.4.254 


DB 


4.7,4,253,253,2,3,6,252,5,255 


A9 DB 


•A9',13 


DB 


1,2,2,3,4,253,6,253,3,252,5,254 


DB 


2,4,3,5,253,2,4,254 


DB 


3,8.2.253.3.4.6,252,5,254 


DB 


4.11.4,253,2,3,6,252,5,255 


AMIN9 DB 


•Am9M3 


DB 


1,3,5,253,3,253,2,4,254 


DB 


2,5,3,253,253,1,5,253,2,252.4,254 



Page 17 





DB 


3,8,2,6,253,3,4,252.5.254 




DB 


4,10,4,253,253,2,3,6.252,5,255 


BBMAJ DB 


•Bb',13 




DB 


1,1,1,2.3,4,5,6,253,253,2,3,4,254 




DB 


2,3,2,3,4,253,253,5,253,6,254 




DB 


3,6,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253,4,5,254 




DB 


4,10,3,253,2.253,4,253,5,255 


BBMIN DB 


•BbmM3 




DB 


1,1,1,2,3,4,5,6,1,253,2,253,3,4,254 




DB 


2,6,1,2,3,4.5,6,253,253,4,5,254 




DB 


3,9,1,253,3,253,2,4,254 




DB 


4,8,4,253,6,253.3,253.2,252,5,255 


BB6 


DB 


'Bb6M3 




DB 


1,3,2,3,4,6,252,5,254 




DB 


2,5,4,253,2,6,253,3,252,5,254 




DB 


3,8,2,3,4,253,253,3,6,252,5,254 




DB 


4,7,3,253,2,4,5,255 


BBMIN6 DB 


•Bbm6M3 




DB 


1,2,2,253,3,4,6,252,5,254 




DB 


2,5,4,253,2,3,6.252,5,254 




DB 


3,8,2,3,4,253,6,253,3,252.5.254 




DB 


4,10,3,5,253,2,4,255 


BB7 


DB 


•Bb7M3 




DB 


1,1.1,2,3,4,5,6,253,2,4,254 




DB 


2,3,2,3,4,253,6,252,5,254 




DB 


3.6,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,3,253.5.254 




DB 


4,8,4,253.2.253.3,6.252,5,255 


BBMIN7 DB 


'Bbm7',13 




DB 


1,1.3,4,5,253,2,253,4,254 




DB 


2,6,1,2.3.4,5.6,253.253.5.254 




DB 


3.10,3,253,2,4,5,254 




DB 


4,11 ,2,3,4,253.253.3,6,252,5,255 


BBMAJ7 DB 


'Bbmaj7',13 




DB 


1,1,1,2,3,4,5,253,3,253,2,4,254 




DB 


2,3,2,3,4,253,253,6,252,5,254 




DB 


3,5,1,253,2,253.3,253,4,253,254 




DB 


4,6,2.6.253,3.4,252,5,255 


BB9 


DB 


•Bb9',13 




DB 


1,1,1,2,3,5,254 




DB 


2,3,2,3,4,253,6,253,3.252.5,254 




DB 


3,5,3,5,253,2.4,254 




DB 


4,7,3,253,1,5,253.2.252,4,255 


BBMIN9 DB 


'Bbm9M3 




DB 


1,1,1,2,5,253.3.254 




DB 


2,2.3.253,2,4,5,254 




DB 


3,5,3,4,5,253,2.253,4.254 




DB 


4.3.2,3.4.253,3.6.252.5,255 


BMAJ 


DB 


'B',13 




DB 


1,2,1,2,3,4,5,6,253.253,2,3,4,254 




DB 


2,4,2,3,4,253,253,5,253,6,254 




DB 


3,7,1,2,3,4,5,6,253.3,253,4,5,254 




DB 


4,11,3,253,2,253.4.253.5.255 


BMIN 


DB 


'Bm',13 




DB 


1.2.1,2.3,4.5,6,253,2.253,3,4.254 




DB 


2,7,1.2.3.4,5,6.253.253.4,5.254 



DB 3,10,1,253,3,253,2,4.254 

DB 4,9,4,253,6,253,3,253,2,252,5,255 

B6 DB 'B6',13 

DB 1,4,2.3,4,6,252,5,254 

DB 2,6,4,253,2,6.253.3,252.5.254 

DB 3.7.6,253,3.253,2,5,252,4,254 

DB 4,9,2,3,4,253,253,3,6,252,5,255 

BMIN6 DB •Bm6',13 

DB 1,3,2,253,3,4,6,252,5,254 

DB 2,6,4,253,2.3,6,252,5,254 

DB 3,9,2,3,4,253,6,253,3,252,5,254 

DB 4.11,3,5,253,2.4,255 

B7 DB 'B7',13 

DB 1,1,4,253,1,3,5,254 

DB 2,2,1,2,3,4,5,253,253,2,4,254 

DB 3,4,2,3,4,253,6,252,5,254 

DB 4,7,1,2,3,4,5,6,253.3,253,5,255 

BMIN7 DB 'BmT.lS 

DB 1,2,1,3,5,254 

DB 2.3.2,253.3,4,253,6,252,5,254 

DB 3,7,1,2,3,4,5,6,253,253,5,254 

DB 4,11,3,253,2.4,5,255 

BMAJ7 DB 'BmajT.lS 

DB 1,2,1,2,3,4,5,253.3,253,2,4,254 

DB 2,4,2,3,4,253,253,6,252,5,254 

DB 3,6,1,253,2,253,3,253,4,254 

DB 4,9,4,253,253,2,3,6,252,5,255 

B9 DB 'B9',13 

DB 1,1,4,253,1,2,3,6,252,5,254 

DB 2,4,2,3,4,253,6,253,3,252,5,254 

DB 3,6,3,5,253.2,4,254 

DB 4,8,3,253,1,5,253,2,252,4,255 

•Bm9',13 

1,2,1,2,3,253,253,4,253,5,254 

2,5,5,253,3,253,2,4,254 

3,7,3,253,253,1,5,253,2,252,4,254 

4,10,2,6.253,3,4,252,5,255 



BMIN9 DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 

TYPLEN DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 
DB 

NUMBIJF DB 
STIBUF DB 
CHRBUF DB 
SELECT DB 



51.55,47,46,46,54,51,44,52 
46,51,44,44,46,48,52,47,43 
44,49,45,43,42,43,53,44,44 
52,50,45,47,47,50,52,45,44 
44,42,41,41,39,42,46,47,43 
51,49,49.45.46,50,49,46,46 
53,50,50,42,45,46,52,45,48 
47,51,45,41,44,52,47,43,44 
50,49,46,46,44,48,49,44,45 
49,44.45,39,44,42,45,43,46 
52.53,44,45,50,47,52,42,42 
51,51,46,44,46,41,51,45,46 

0,0 
0,0 

0,0,13 
0,0 



C-Cm9 

Db-Dbm9 

D-Dm9 

Eb-Ebm9 

E-Em9 

F-Fm9 

Gb-Gbm9 

G-gm9 

Ab-Abm9 

A-Am9 

Bb-Bbm9 

B-Bm9 



Page 18 



END START 



TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



BEAT THE GAME 



By Daniel Myers 




Sorcerer 

An Infocom Adventure 

Well, you took care of Krill and returned to the 
Guild Hall in triumph, but things don't look good for 
you at the moment. Not when you're standing there 
facing the slavering jaws of a vicious hellhound! 
Fortunately for you, this time, it's only a dream, so 
just wait, and you will wake up in your room in the 
Guild Hall. Whew! 

However, it's a bit dark in here, so Frotz your 
speUbook, get up, and head West into the hallway. 
Read the note on your door if you like, although it's 
not all that important. It just lets you know you are 
here alone. Now's a good a time as any to tell you 
that not all the spells you know will be useful in the 
game, nor all the potions you will find. So unless 
you're told specifically to take an item, you can 
safely ignore it. 

Now, head along South down the hall until you 
reach the Ix)bby. Go West into the Store Room, and 

TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



pick up the Ochre Vial and the matchbook. Open the 
vial and drink the potion, which will prevent you 
from becoming hungry and thirsty. Drop the now- 
empty vial. Read the matchbook if you like, then 
return East and place the matchbook in the 
receptacle. 

Moving North twice, and West once, brings you 
to Belboz's quarters. Listen to the bird as you lift the 
wall hanging, reveahng a key. Now examine the 
desk and open the drawer. Inside are several items, 
but the only useful one is the journal. Use the key to 
unlock the journal, then read it. Make careful note 
of the day's code!! 

Go East to the hall again, South once, and West 
into HeHstar's room. Here you will find a scroll of 
Gaspar. Take and Gnusto the scroll, then head back 
to the hall, and South to the Ix)bby. By this time, 
you've probably heard the doorbell chime, which 
means the mail's in. Open the receptacle, and inside 
is an issue of Popular Enchanting and an Orange 
Vial. Get the vial, then go East into the Library. 

There is a scroU of Meef here. Get and Gnusto 
that one. Now, it's time to leave this place. If you've 
played the game before, you know that if you try 
going out the main entrance, you will be stopped. 
You may also know that if you DON'T get out, you 
wiU eventually fall asleep and find yourself in the 
Room of Living Death, which is MOST unpleasant, 
and from which there is no escape. 

So, now's the time to get a move on! Head down 
into the Cellar, where the trunk is. There are five 
buttons on the trunk, and each one is a different 
color. The sequence to open the trunk is keyed to the 
code of the day in the journal, and will change with 
each game. The code itself is the colors of a monster 
from the Infotater. Whatever monster was noted in 
the journal, look it up on the Infotater, and make 
note of its colors, and what order they are in. Save 
the game (just in case, because if you make even one 
httle error, you will not be able to open the trunk!!), 
then press the buttons in the proper order as given 
in the Infotater. If you've done it right, the trunk hd 
will spring open by itself after you push the last 
button. If the trunk does not open, restore the game 
and try again. 

Ok, so now you have the moldy scroll of Aimfiz, 

Page 19 



which is one of those complex ones that you can only 
use once. Actually, you only need to use it once, so 
that's no problem. All you have to do is figure out 
which person you want to exchange places with. 
Since there aren't too many choices, it won't take 
you long to discover it's none other than Belboz 
himself. So, Aimfiz Belboz, and you're out of the Hall 
and on your way to visiting Jeear! 

Ok, so now you're out of the Hall, but look where 
the spell took you: to the same forest you were 
dreaming of at the start of the game. And there's the 
Hellhound, too! And this time, it's no dream! You 
better not wait around this time, so immediately 
head Northeast to the Forest Edge. 

Here you will find a Snake Hole, as well as paths 
North and East. The North path is mined with 
magical mines. This is a red herring in the game, as 
there is no way to go safely along the path. You can 
ignore it without fear of missing something 
important. The Snake Hole is another matter, so 
climb down into it, and then down again to the Slimy 
Room, and South from there into the Crater. 

Go West to the Chasm's Edge. You can't jump 
across the chasm, but flying over is no problem. 
Learn Izyuk twice, cast it on yourself once. Now just 
go West twice and you will be on the other side. Go 
North, and you will be in a room with what appears 
to be a tree of coins. However, that's an illusion, and 
you will only be able to get one coin. Take it, return 
to the Chasm Edge, then Izyuk and fly back across. 

Now go back the way you came, all the way to 
the Forest Edge. This time, go East to the Meadow 
(don't stop to admire scenery; those are MEAN 
locusts on the horizon!), then Northeast to the 
Riverbank. Learn the Pulver spell, then Pulver the 
river. It will dry up, and you can move East into the 
river, where you will see a small cave to the 
Northeast. Go there. 

Inside, you will find several items. Get the scroU 
with the Fweep spell, and Gnusto it. Then get the 
bat guano, but leave the vial; it has no use in the 
game. Now go down the hole, and you will be at the 
Fit of Bones. If you go South, you will find the 
Torture Chamber, which has another useless potion, 
so go Southwest into the Dungeon instead. From 
here, go up into the Ruins. 

Learn Izyuk again, then go West across the 
drawbridge (careful, don't fall in!!), then West again 
to the Meadow, where you now cast Izyuk on 
yourself. You have time to do that and move before 
the locusts arrive. Once you're flying, go Northeast 



to the Riverbank, and this time. Southeast to the 
Fort Entrance. You need to use Izyuk because the 
river bank has a distressing tendency to crumble 
after the first visit. 

Around about now, you're probably feeling 
sleepy. Don't worry about it, just lie down and sack 
out for awhile. You may or may not have a strange 

dream. Ignore any dreams, as they are just "for 
show", and have no important clues to the game. 
When you waken again, go East into the Parade 
Ground. There is a flag at the top of a tall flagpole; 
lower the flag and search it. You will find an Aqua 
Vial. Take that, it will come in handy later. 

Now, go East again, and you will be at the 
cannon. If you look inside, you wiU see what appears 
to be a pile of scrolls. Actually, they are not scroUs at 
all, but a group of Yipples, peacefully sleeping in the 
barrel. However, there IS one real scroll in there, 
and you will need it later. So, drop the bat guano 
into the barrel, and the Yipples will take off, leaving 
the real scroU, with the Yonk spell for you to take. 

You are now just about finished above ground. 
Return to the entrance, learn Izyuk twice, and fly 
Northwest to the River Bank, and South West to the 
meadow. Here you should Izyuk again (the 
drawbridge is Hke the river bank) and go East twice 
to the Ruins. 

From the Ruins, go down into the Dungeon, 
down again to the Highway, and then East to the 
ToU Gate and the sleeping Gnome. Wake him up and 
give him your Zorkmid. He'll open the gate, then 
promptly fall asleep again. Go East through the 
gate. 

Ignore the store; that's another red herring in 
the game. Continue East to the End of the Highway. 
There's a hut here, but we won't be looking in there 
just now. Instead, go North to the Entrance Hall, 
and then North again to the Glass Arch. You are 
about to enter the infamous Glass Maze. 

Getting through it the first time is quite easy; 
getting out again is quite another matter. There are 
two ways back, the long and hard way, or the quick 
and dirty way. If you want to go the easy route, 
learn Caspar once and Fweep once, then Caspar 
yourself right now. If you want do to it the hard way, 
learn Fweep three times. 

Ok, drop everything here, go East into the Maze, 
and Fweep yourself. Now fly along the following 
route: North, East, South, South, West, Down, East, 
East, North, North, Up, Up, South, East and you're 



Page 20 



TRSTimes magazine 8.6 ■ Nov/Dec 1995 



now at the Hollow. Here you will find the Swanzp 
scroll, but you can't do much until Fweep wears off. 
So wait around until you're human again. 

As soon as you pick up the scroll, the maze 
layout will change. Oops! Now what? Well, first, 
drop the scroll down the hole (it's the chimney of the 
Uttle hut). Now what you do next depends on how 
you decided to get back out. If you opted for quick 
and dirty, walk West, West, South, East, and you 
will fall through the Maze and splatter. However, 
the Caspar spell will activate, and your Guardian 
Angel will restore you to life at the spot the spell was 
cast, which in this case was the Glass Arch. 

However, if you want to do it the hard way, then 
here's how: Fweep yourself, then fly the following 
route: West, West, South, Down, Down, West, West, 
Up, Up, North, North, Down, East. At about this 
point, the spell will wear off. Fweep again, and 
continue: South, East, North, Down, West, South, 
West, Up, West, and you're back at the Arch again. 
Whew!! 

Again, wait around till the spell wears off, then 
pick up everything and go to the hut. In the 
fireplace, you will see the Swanzo scroll. Gnusto the 
spell, and then take a nap, because by now you're 
tired again. 

Awakening refreshed, leave the hut and head on 
back to the Toll Gate. The Gnome is stiU here, and 
still asleep, so now's your chance: search him, and 
you will find your Zorkmid! All right! Now, keep 
going West until you come to the Bend, where you 
head Southwest to the Edge of the Crater, then 
Down into the crater itself. From there, move along 
South into the North/South tunnel, and the 
Southwest to the Amusement Park Entrance. 

Try to go West, and a Gnome will appear and 
demand a Zorkmid. Give him your coin, and then 
proceed West into the park. Of all the places here, 
only one is important: the Arcade. Everything else is 
pretty much for show. So, keep on West until you 
reach the end of the Midway, and then go South into 
the Arcade. 

Open the Aqua Vial, drink the potion, then drop 
the vial. You are now dexterous enough to win a 
prize, so take the ball and throw it at a bunny. POW! 
Direct hit! As the bunny goes flying, the hawker will 
give you a glittering scroll of Malyon. You don't need 
to Gnusto this one, as it will be used only once, and 
very soon. 

Now leave the park, and once back in the tunnel, 
go south and you will be in the Carving Room. One 

TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



carving looks like a dragon, and that's the one you 
want. First, Yonk Malyon. Then, learn Malyon. 
Finally, Malyon Dragon. The souped-up spell brings 
the Dragon to life! Good thing for you it's not 
permanent, or you might have been fried to a crisp! 
In any case, there is now a passage South through 
the wall. Take that into the Sooty Room. 

Now you're about to enter the most bizarre part 
of the game. Open the Orange Vial. Frotz yourself. 
Go East into the Coal Bin room. There will be a cave- 
in behind you, so you can't go back now. In addition, 
you're having some some trouble breathing, so drink 
the orange potion and drop the vial. Suddenly, your 
Older Self appears, sliding down from the Upper 
Chute! Listen carefully, and your twin will tell you 
a number. Make careful note of it! Now, hand your 
spellbook to your Twin, who will take it and dive 
down the Lower Chute. 

Go East to the Dial Room. There is a dial on the 
door, which can be set to any number from 0-873. 
Set it to the number your Twin just gave you. This 
is also a variable number and wOl change from game 
to game. Then open the door, and go into the Shaft 
Bottom. Get the rope. Make sure that you have 
nothing with you now but that rope. If you have 
anything else, drop it. 

CHmb up to the Shaft Top. Go Southwest into 
the mine. A timber is here (doesn't that bring back 
fond memories of Zork?). Tie the rope to the timber, 
then continue on Northwest and West. You are now 
at the top of the Upper Chute. Put the beam across 
the chute, then drop the rope down the chute. 
Finally, cHmb down the rope, and you will be in the 
Slanted Room. 

There is a scroll here, and also an opened 
lantern. Get the scroll, and Golmac yourself back in 
time. Now open the lantern, and get the Vardik 
spell. Time is running short, so go East down the 
chute into the Coal Bin room, where you will 
see.. ..your Younger Self! 

Now, most important: you must do as your twin 
did before! Tell your Twin the combination to the 
Dial Room door. Now your Twin will give you the 
spell book, just as you did earlier (really one of the 
neater parts of this game!). As soon as you have the 
book, go down the Lower Chute to the Lagoon. 

Ah, air again! Take a deep breath, then sleep 
awhile, because you're probbaly tired again. Now 
learn Meef twice, Swanzo, once drop the spellbook, 
and go East into the Lagoon. Dive down to the 
bottom, and Meef the Spenseweeds, revealing a 
crate. Get the crate and return to shore. 

Page 21 



Drop and open the crate. Inside, among other 
things, is a can of grue repellant. Get that, and walk 
Northeast along the Ocean Shore and North to the 
Mouth of the River. There is a cave to the West, it's 
entrance covered by nasty-looking vines. Meef the 
vines, and Vardik yourself. 

Now, spray the repellant on yourself and enter 
the cave. Wow! Grues are everwhere, and they don't 
fear the light!! Fortunately though, the repellant 
still works. However, I wouldn't advise staying 
around! So, move along West and you will come to 
three doors. Two of them lead to VERY unpleasant 
circumstances. You don't want those, so open the 
white door. 

Inside the room is Belboz, who is possessed by 
the demon Jeear. Swanzo Belboz, and the demon 
will leave him, and attempt to enter YOUR mind! 
But the Vardik spell will keep him out, and, with no 
host avail ble, he will vanish! Belboz will now 
regain his senses, and will magic the both of you 
back to the Guild Hall. Here Belboz announces his 
retirement, and names you as the new head of the 
Circle! Congratulations, Sorcerer! 




Suspect 

An Infocom Adventure 

"Suspect" is a little different from the previous 
two Infocom mysteries. In both "Deadline" and 
"Witness", you were the police, gathering evidence, 
questioning suspects, and making the arrest. This 
time around, however, you're on the other side of the 
fence: YOU are the suspect, and the police are 
gathering evidence against you, for a crime you 
didn't commit. The game is thus a race against time, 
as you desperately attempt to collect the real 
evidence before you're arrested. 

The adventure is centered on a critical point; 
until you realize that point, you really don't know 



what you're looking for, and much evidence can be 
overlooked or spoiled. The critical point is the fact 
that Veronica is murdered before the game begins. 
That elaborate fairy costume, with its over-the-head 
mask, allows someone else to impersonate her, and 
thus provide an aHbi for the real murderer. 

Also, you will notice that this is by far the 
busiest Infocom ever; people move around a lot in 
the game, and you're almost always running into, or 
seeing, someone or other. Most of the time, you don't 
have to worry about that (I think they just put that 
that in there to confuse you a little, and make you 
waste time following harmless people around). 

It is also necessary to collect ever last bit of 
evidence. Overlook one thing, and you'll never be 
able to get a conviction, no matter how sure you are 
of who is guilty. So, with all that in mind, let's get 
started. 

So there you are in the plush Ashcroft manor on 
Halloween night, enjoying a costume ball being 
hosted by Veronica Ashcroft, and wondering what 
sort of story you can work up for your newspaper. As 
the game begins, you're invited to join Michael, 
dressed as a sheik, and a small group of people. 

You might as weU go over there, and marvel at 
the performance given by the woman in the fairy 
costume, supposedly, but not really, Veronica. 
Having made sure she creates a fuss by spiUing a 
drink on herself, she promptly leaves. Don't bother 
following her, you have better things to do. Go East 
to the bar, then North to the French Doors. 

Unlock the doors, then open them and go East. 
Wow, it sure is pouring out there, isn't it? This is one 
of the crucial points of evidence in the game; you 
must note the rainfall now, and again in a little 
while. In the meantime, you can drop your costume 
receipt, pen, and notebook here; they are merely 
excess baggage, and you won't need them for 
anything. 

Ok, now it's time to head for the front door, to let 
in a late arrival who is on her way. Go West to re- 
enter the Balh-oom, South to the Bar, then straight 
West until you reach the Long Hall South. Go South 
from there to where the Long Hall Begins, and West 
again until you come to the Front Hall. 

Now it's South to the Entry Hall. Anytime now, 
the front doorbell will ring. When that happens, 
unlock the front door and open it. Alicia will come 
sashaying in. After she does that, step outside 
South, and observe the rain. Hmmmmm, looks like 
it's let up a little, only a drizzle is faUing now. 



Page 22 



TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



Having gained your first piece of evidence, you 
now go get some more, by heading to the office, 
where Veronica sits, strangled with your cowboy 
lariat. Go North to the Front Hall, West to the 
Hallway Intersection, South to the Corner, West, 
and then North. 

And here you are in a very messy office. 
WTioever did this sure did a good job! But there's no 
time to worry about the papers and other items 
strewn about. First, get the manila folder from the 
desk and the fairy mask from the floor. Look in the 
waste basket and get the business card. Finally, 
unpleasant though it may be, search the body. 

Aha! A silver bullet. In fact, it's a bullet from 
your gunbelt, thoughtfully placed on the scene as 
additional evidence against you. Take the buUet and 
put it back in your belt. Under no circumstances 
remove the rope; if you do that, you will never get a 
conviction against the real killer. 

Since there is some time yet before the murder 
is discovered and the poHce arrive, you can go pick 
up another vital piece of evidence, in the kitchen. 
Make your way back to Long Hall South, then 
straight North to the Dining Room and from there 
East into the Kitchen. 

Here is a trashbasket with the remains of the 
broken glass that "Veronica" dropped. Careful now; 
don't get the glass (or you'll spoil the fmgerprints on 
it!), get the whole basket (you may feel a bit odd 
running around with the trashbasket, but it's 
necessary!). Now it's time to play hide and seek. 

So, trashbasket in hand, you now make your 
way to the garage. Go North at the Hallway 
Intersection (you should know how to get there by 
now!), until you come to the door to the walkway. 
The door is locked, but fortunately, being on the 
inside, you can unlock it, and open the door. Go 
North onto the walkway, then West to the garage. 

The first thing you notice is a tool chest. Open 
that, and get the crowbar. Now you can take a 
moment to admire the BMW and the Mercedes, but 
don't take too long. Someone will be coming soon. So, 
hide behind the Mercedes and wait. In fact, you can 
wait for Michael. 

The reason you are waiting is that, while you've 
been busily collecting evidence, a carefully-faked 
argument has taken place in the Ballroom. This will 
lead to the discovery of the body by Michael, Colonel 
Marston, and Cochrane. And as soon as Michael 
leaves the office, he will head straight for the garage 
(if you've played this part before, you may have been 

TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



suspicious of his doing something so odd, but 
following him won't help you to find out what he's up 
to). 

And yes, here he comes. From your vantage 
point, you can see him open the trunk of the BMW, 
although what he's doing there isn't clear.. .yet! Keep 
waiting until he leaves (by that time, the police will 
have arrived), then open the BMW trunk with the 
crowbar. Well, look at that, there's a Trust Folder in 
the trunk! 

Drop the crowbar and get the folder. The next 
part is crucial, and you have very little time to 
spare. You must get back to the Fireplace in the 
Ballroom as soon as you can. You have to be there 
when Marston arrives, or you'll lose an important 
piece of evidence. 

WTiile you've been breaking into the car trunk, 
Michael and Marston have been meeting briefly in 
the library, where Michael hands over a piece of 
paper to Marston. You could hide in the library, and 
watch the transaction (instead of first going to the 
garage and hiding there), but still you have to go the 
garage later anyway. Either way, you must get to 
the Fireplace quickly. 

So high-tail it directly back to the Ballroom. 
Don't take any time to do sight-seeing. Once at the 
Fireplace, just wait. You won't have to wait very 
long. Marston will come in, and try to burn 
something in the Fireplace. Grab the paper before 
it's reduced to ashes. WTiew! That was a close one. 

At this point, you have two ways to go. You can 
try spooking the guilty parties, or you can just go 
about giving your evidence to the detective, and let 
it go at that. If you want to try shaking up Michael 
and Alicia (you probably guessed that by now), you 
need to show your evidence to them. Show 
everything that concerns Michael to Michael, and 
everj'thing that concerns Alicia to Alicia (don't 
forget the analysis reports later on). This is tricky, 
since you must also give the detective some of your 
evidence, before he decides to arrest you, so watch 
your timing if you want to go about doing this (I 
won't tell you what happens; try it and see for 
yourself). 

Speaking of the detective, it's time to go find him 
and begin presenting some of the items you've been 
collecting. He's usually in the vicinty of the office, 
checking out the various rooms, after which he 
heads to the Ballroom and stays there. You don't 
want to wait for that, since he'll probably arrest you 
for the crime. It's better to go after him, and give 
him a few other things to think about. 

Page 23 



Once you've located the detective, and he stays 
in one place long enough, you can begin to hand over 
some ofyour little treasures. First, have him get the 
glass analyzed for fingerprints (and now, at last, you 
can drop the trashbasket!). 

While Duffy is on his way to the lab, give the 
detective the two folders and the paper. Hey, that 
sure got him interested, didn't it? However, hang on 
to the mask and the card, because it's not yet time 
for those (by the way, have you looked inside the 
mask yet? You'll need to get that hair analyzed too, 
and Duffy isn't here to do that). 

You still need some more evidence to wrap up 
the case, so head back once more to the Ballroom. 
Along the way, stop off in the East Coat Closet, and 
pick up the wet overcoat. A quick glance at the label 
tells you that it belongs to Alicia. Hmmmm, 
suspicious that it's so soaked, and it was only 
drizzling when she arrived! 

When you get to the Ballroom, locate Cochrane 
(dressed as an astronaut). You'll most likely find him 
at the Bar. Show him the card, and he will give you 
some important (verbal) evidence. Now go back to 
the Fireplace, and hang out until the detective 
arrives. 

When he does get there, show him the coat. He 
doesn't seem too impressed, so tell him about the 
rain (NOTE: There is a variance among the different 
computer versions. Save the game first, and then 
try: TELL DETECTIVE ABOUT RAIN. If that 
doesn't work, restore and try: TELL DETECTIVE 
ABOUT WEATHER. One or the other of these 
should do the trick). 

Somewhere along the line, the detective will get 
the fingerprint analysis and show it to you (actually, 
he gives it to you). You aren't surprised to find that 
it's not Veronica's prints on the glass. Now, have the 
dark hair analyzed (did you ever look at Veronica's 
hair? She is (or was) a blonde). 

While you wait for the hair analysis, give the 
business card to the detective (you don't have to tell 
him about Cochrane). Then just wait again until the 
hair analysis comes back. All right, this is the big 
moment! Tell the detective to arrest Michael and 
Ahcia. 

TA-DA! Your evidence makes an air-tight case, 
and both Michael and Alicia will be in prison for a 
long, long time! For a journalist, you're a pretty good 
detective (of course, there was a small incentive 
involved!). 

Page 24 



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SOME THOUGHTS ON RADIO SHACK PRINTERS 

by Roy T. Beck 



Every so often you will see one of the old 
"battleship-gray" R/S printers at a swap meet or 
salvage store, and you wonder what kind of a 
bargain it might be. How do you know what its 
characteristics are? You could write to Ft. Worth for 
a manual, but that's a bummer, considering the cost 
and delay. 

I recently got to thinking about the wide variety 
of printers and printer-like devices Radio Shack has 
produced over the years. I have most of the catalogs 
in the RSC- series, running from RSC-2 through 
RSC-22A. a am missing RSC-1 and RSC-13). This 
library is very useful in searching out data about 
various R/S products. Since this covers the period 
from 1978 to 1991, (the TRS era), I decided to 
tabulate all of the printers by their characteristics. 
As you read the table, you will notice a number of 
"holes". I am sorry about these, but the catalog 
listing of some of the machines doesn't always 
provide all the expected information. Also, I have to 
insert the usual legal escape clause. I'm not 
responsible for any errors you may find in the 
article. I have done the best I can, but I'm only 
human and I do make errors. (R/S is also known to 
make occasional errors!). 

You may not even recognize some of these 
printers, but, yes. Radio Shack did produce all of 
them. Before tabulating them, I would like to 
describe the types of printers R/S has produced. 
Taking them in order, I will give a thumb-nail 
sketch of each type so you will be famihar with them. 
These are: 

1. Electrostatic Printers 

The electrostatic type is (fortunately) an obsolete 
type originally offered in the Model I era. The 
earhest one was called the Screen Printer, and it 
was for this printer that the Model I had a 40 line 
bus connection on the left side of the expansion 
interface labeled "screen printer". This is where you 
would plug in the screen printer or any other bus 
device you might own. When you pushed a button on 
the printer, the image on the screen of the computer 
at that moment was printed. Actually, the Screen 
Printer design was closely integrated with the 
operation of the computer. When the screen printer 
was actuated, it seized control of the computer, 
HALTed the Z-80 CPU, and did a DMA transfer of 
the screen image by scanning the video ROM (at 



2200 CPS!). While this was a technological tour de 
force, it also made the Screen Printer essentially 
incompatible with everything that was not a Model 
I, Level I computer. The Screen Printer used an 
electric arc to burn a thin film of aluminum off of a 
paper substrate, leaving black letters on an 
aluminum foU surface of a sheet of paper. 

The Quick Printer (I) and Quick Printer II used 
the same printing technique, but much slower 
because it did not do DMA. The results of aU three 
printers were uniformly poor. The letter size and 
shape was fixed in the design of each printer, could 
not be altered, was very small, and produced a bad 
smell in the process of printing. Yes, they worked, 
but not well, and we are well rid of them. 

2. Pen Plotters 

R/S produced several pen plotter devices. Most of 
them used a small baU point or felt tip pen to scribe 
letters onto paper, which was very limited in size. 
These were really intended to produce graphic 
images, but I am including them because they could 
operate as printers when desired. 

3. Ink Jet Printers 

R/S also produced an ink-jet printer, the CGP- 
220 which was really a plotter. 

4. Thermal Printers 

Thermal printers were offered for the PC-3 and 
PC-4 pocket computers. Thermal printers are quiet, 
but suffer from the need for special paper, usually 
rather narrow, and worse, the image will fade with 
time, especially when exposed to sunhght. The TP- 
10 and TRP-100 units were intended for use with 
desk top computers. The TRP-100 was especially 
clever; it could operate on batteries or AC power, 
and could use either thermal paper or a thermal 
ribbon to place images on plain paper. 

5. Daisy Wheel Printers 

Many different daisy wheel printers were offered 
at various times. All but one of these are identified 
with model names beginning with "DWP-", meaning 
"daisy wheel printer" The odd one was named "DW- 
ir, which also meant daisy wheel. I am not sure if 
there ever was a DW-I printer; the II on DW-II 



Page 26 



TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



would seem to imply this, but I haven't found any 
solid evidence of such. Possibly a "DW-I" was 
planned but never got into production. Bill Barden, 
another author, indicates the DW-1 existed but I 
can't find it in the catalogs I have. See Table 5. 
Table 5A lists the wheels for some of the printers. 
There are inconsistencies in the catalogs, especially 
regarding the wheels for the DW-II and the DW-410; 
if the same wheel fits both, as for example, the Pica 
10, then why should there be different wheels for 
certain other fonts, as for example Courier 10? This 
doesn't make good sense, but it is what I found in the 
catalogs. 

6. Impact Dot Matrix 

R/S produced a great multitude of Impact type 
dot matrix machines, numbering at least 38 
different models. Wow! I suspect they ordered each 
batch of printers to a specification, and when that 
batch was sold out and more were needed, a new 
si)ecification was developed. Seems like a silly way 
to operate, but the evidence is in the catalogs. See 
Table 6. 

Naming these printers was a problem. Initially, 
they produced a dot matrix model called simply the 
"Line Printer". After this one, there came a series of 
eight machines named LP-I through LP-VIII. After 
these. Radio Shack decided to use descriptive letter 
prefixes, and the letters DMP for dot matrix printer 
were used for most of the later machines. There was 
a PC-1 printer which was a dot matrix printer for 
use with the original pocket computer. There is also 
a machine identified as LMP-2150, which is also a 
dot matrix printer. 

Some printers may not have existed. Certain R/S 
catalogs refer to ribbons for printers which 
apparently were never in the catalogs. Examples are 
the DMP- 133 and DMP-300, which are Usted for 
replacement ribbons, but which were not themselves 
Hsted in the RSC catalogs. I am sure the DMP-300 
was a typo, and should have been DMP-302. I can't 
account for the DMP- 133, probably another tjiDO 
when the catalogs were prepared. 

7. Laser Printers 

Finally, R/S produced at least two laser printers, 
under the descriptors LP-950 and LP- 1000. 
Evidently LP in this case meant laser printer, as 
opposed to LP-roman numeral which was the 
original dot matrix impact series. See Table 7. Both 
of these printed six pages per minute (PPM) and had 
a resolution of 300 dots per inch (DPI). 



T'^STimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



There you have it, seven major types of 
machines, totaling about 60 machines all told. 

Miscellaneous Comments 

I have included the ribbon catalog numbers for 
two reasons; one is to allow you to identify similar 
print mechanisms, and the other for the sake of 
assisting you to order the correct ribbon for your 
machine. Based upon the commonality of ribbons 
among the dot matrix machines, it is reasonable to 
assume the corresponding machines are by the same 
manufacturer, with similar internal parts. 

I have also included my available information on 
print wheels for the daisy wheel machines. 

The catalog prices are shown for information 
only. Knowing the relative original prices of the 
various machines wiU give you some information 
about the relative quaUty of printers you may see at 
swap meets. Usually, R/S introduced its products at 
some price, and then later reduced the price. In a 
few cases, they actually raised printer prices in later 
catalogs. The tables also show which catalogs listed 
each printer. Table 8 shows the date of each RSC 
catalog. By noting which catalogs listed a particular 
printer, and then checking Table 8, you can 
determine the initial and final offering date of each 
printer, and thus can determine the approximate 
age of any particular machine you may see at a swap 
meet, etc. 

Where possible, I have listed the print speed in 
characters per second (CPS) and the maximum 
paper width in inches which can be accommodated. 
Note that tractor feed paper is about one inch wider 
than the final product because of the tear-off edges. 
Several of the printers use narrower than 8.5 inch 
paper. Beware of these. The standard paper sizes 
you might expect to see are 8.5 and 9.5 inch wide, 
where the extra inch represents the tearoff edge 
containing sprocketed holes. Similarly, 14.875 inch 
paper is available, which has 14 inches of useable 
width, whether the edges tear off or not. I have 
rounded this paper to 15 inches in the table. Most of 
the wide carriage printers will work just fme with 
8.5 or 9.5 inch paper, some much less, down to as 
small as 4 inches. I have Hsted the maximum quoted 
capacity of each machine. The Line Printer and the 
two versions of LP-1 were upper case only; avoid 
them. 

As you all know, I am sure, R/S computers are 
designed to send only a carriage return (CR) to the 
printer at the end of each line. R/S printers are 
designed to interpret this command as meaning the 

Page 27 



printer should execute both a CR 


and a line feed 


some will accept both. I do not have 


any overall data 


(LF). But other comp 


uters are desi 


gned to 


send a 


for th 


is, I can only 


comment upon the situation. 


separate CR and LF under the same circumstances. 


Since 


you really ou 


ght to have 


the manual for 


Most R/S printers can be set up to 


recognize both 


whatever printer you 


have, you can 


find this info for 


these circumstances, 


but there is 


no consistent 


your printer in you 


r manual. R/S is pretty good 


standard for how you program them 


to do this 


. Some 


about making manuals available for old equipment, 


printers have a DIP switch to enable the CR+LF 


so do order one from them. g 


semm 


response, some will ac 


cept software 


commands, and 






.mlirinT 














Table 1 












Electrostatic Printer 










Speed 


Max 


Orig. 


Listed in 


Paper 


Model 


Cat. No. 


CPS 


Dots Paper 


Prices 


Cat RSC- 


No. 


Quick Printer (I) 


26-1153 


100 


7 4.75 


499 


2 to 3 


26-1405 


Quick Printer II 


26-1155 


64 


7 2.375 


219 


3 to 5 


26-1412 


Screen Printer 


26-1151 


2200 
Max 


7 4.75 

Table 2 
Pen Plotters 

Orig. 


599 
Listed in 


1 


26-1405 


Model 


Cat. No. 


Paper 


Prices 


Cat RSC-. 






CGP-115 


26-1192 


4.5 


250 to 200 


8 to 11 






FP-215 


26-1193 


10 


995 


8 to 14 






Multi-Pen Plotter 


26-1191 


8.5 


1995 


6 to 9 






PC-2 


26-3605 


2.25 


240 


8 






Plotter/Printer 


26-1190 


9 


1460 
Table 3 


4 to 7 












[nk Jet Printers 










Speed 


Max 


Orig. 


Listed in 


Ribbon 


Model 


Cat. No. 


CPS 


Pins Paper 


Prices 


Cat RSC- 


No. 


CGP-220 


26-1268 


37 


7 8.5 
Table 4 


699 to 599 


10 to 16 


26-1281 
26-1282 






Thermal Printers 










Speed 


Max 


Orig. 


Listed in 


Paper 


Model 


Cat. No. 


CPS 


Dots Paper 


Price S 


Cat RSC- 


No. 


PC-3 


26-3591 


24 


7 2.25 


120 


14 


26-3592 


PC-4 


26-3652 


20 


7 1.5 


80 


9 to 14 


26-???? 


PC-8 


26-3591 


24 


7 2.25 


120 


19 


26-3592 


TP-10 


26-1261 


30 


7 4 


100 


12 to 15 




TRP-100 


26-1275 


50 


7 8.5 


300 


12 to 16 


26-1297 



Page 28 



TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 









Table 5 












Daisy Wheel Printers 








Speed Max 


Orig. Listed in 


Ribbon 


Model 


Cat. No. 


Char/Sec Paper 


Price $ Cat RSC- 


No. 


DW-II 


26-1158 


43 


16" 


1960 to 1995 4 to 11 


26-1419 
26-1449 


DW-IIB 


26- 


This printer is a slight 


upgrade of DW-II 




DWP-210 


26-1257 


18 


13 


799 to 599 10 to 14 


26-1445 
26-1458 


DWP-220 


26-1278 


20 


16 


599 15 to 16 


26-1299 


DWP-230 


26-2812 


20 


16 


400 to 460 17to20A 


26-1445 
26-1458 


DWP-410 


26-1250 


25 


16 


1495 to 1295 8 to 11 


26-1419 
26-1449 


DWP-510 


26-1270 


43 


16 


1495 12 to 16 


26-1419 
26-1449 


DWP-520 


26-2800 


43 


16 
Table 5A 


995 17 to 19 


26-1445 
26-1458 








Wheels for Table 5 




Name of Wheel 


DW-II 




DWP-210 


DWP-220 


DWP-410 


Courier 10 


26-1420 




26-1467 


26-1230 


26-1430 


Prestige Elite 12 


26-1421 




26-1468 




26-1431 


Madeleine PS 


26-1422 








26-1432 


Cubic PS 


26-1425 








26-1433 


Title Italic 12 


26-1426 








26-1434 


OCRB 


26-1484 








26-1435 


Letter Gothic 12 


26-1485 






26-1231 


26-1436 


Cubic 15 


26-1487 








26-1438 


Bold PS 


26-1488 








26-1439 


Venezia PS 






26-1469 


26-1232 




Scientific A/N 


26-1486 








26-1486 


Pica 10 


26-1290 








26-1290 


Narrator 


26-1291 








26-1291 


OCR-A 


26-1292 








26-1292 


Elite 12 


26-1293 








26-1293 



TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



Page 29 









Table 6 












Impact Dot Matrix Printers 










Speed 




Max 


Orig. 


Listed in 


Ribbon 


Model 


Cat. No. 


CPS 


Pins 


Paper 


Prices 


CatRSC- 


No. 


Line Printer 


26-1150 


60 


7 


9.8 


1300 


2 


LP-I 


26-1152 


60 


7 


12.1 


1559 


2 to 3 


26-1413 


LP-II 


26-1154 


100 


7 


9.5 


970 to 799 


3 to 5 


26-1413 


LP-III 


26-1156 


120 


9 


15 


1960 


3 to 4 


26-1414 


LP-IV 


26-1159 


50 


9 


9.5 


999 


4 to 5 


26-1413 


LP-V 


26-1165 


160 


9 


15 


1860 


5 to 7 


26-1414 


LP-VI 


26-1166 


100 


7 


15 


1160 


4 to 7 


26-1418 


LP-VII 


26-1167 


30 


7 


9.5 


399 


6 to 7 


26-1424 


LP-VIII 


26-1168 


100 


9 


9.5 


799 


6 to 7 


26-1418 


DMP-100 


26-1253 


50 


7 


9.5 


399 


8 to 10 


26-1424 


DMP-105 


26-1276 


80 


9 


9.5 


200 


12tol7B 


26-1288 


DMP-106 


26-2802 


80 


9 


9.5 


220 


19 to 20 A 


26-1288 


DMP-107 


26-2821 


100 


9 


10 


280 


22 to 22A 


26-1235 
26-1236 


DMP-110 


26-1271 


50 


9 


10 


400 


11 to 14 


26-1283 


DMP-120 


26-1255 


120 


9 


9.5 


500 


10 to 14 


26-1483 


DMP-130 


26-1280 


100 


28 


10 


350 


15tol7B 


26-1235 
26-1236 
26-1238 


DMP-130A 


26-1280A 


120 


28 


10 


360 


19 


26-1235 
26-1236 
26-1238 


DMP-132 


26-2814 


120 




10 


380 


20A 


26-1235 
26-1236 
26-1238 


DMP-134 


26-2848 


160 


9 


10 


360 


22 to 22A 


26-1235 
26-1236 


DMP-200 


26-1254 


120 


9 


9.5 


799 to 699 


8 to 11 


26-1483 


DMP-240 


26-2839 


192 


24 


10 


550 


22 to 22A 


26-2824 
26-2826 


DMP-302 


26-2849 


270 


24 


10 


599 


22 to 22A 


26-2819 


DMP-400 


26-1251 


140 


9 


15 


1195 


8 to 9 


26-1418 


DMP-420 


26-1267 


140 


9 


15 


999 


lOtoll 


26-1418 


DMP-430 


26-1277 


180 


18 


15 


899 to 699 


12tol7B 


26-1296 


DMP-440 


26-2808 


300 


9 


15 


699 


19 to 20 A 


26-2809 
26-2827 


DMP-442 


26-2822 


300 


9 


16 


699 


21Ato22A 


26-2823 


DMP-500 


26-1252 


220 


9 


15 


1795 to 999 


8 to 11 


26-1482 


DMP-2100 


26-1256 


160 


24 


15 


1995 


9toll 


26-1442 


DMP-2100P 


26-1274 


160 


24 


15 


1995 to 1495 12 to 16 


26-1442 


DMP-2102 


26-2817 


270 


24 


16 


999 


21A 


26-2819 


DMP-2103 


26-2850 


270 


24 


16 


899 


22 to 22A 


26-2819 



Page 30 



TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



DMP-2110 
DMP-2120 



DMP-2130 
LMP-2150 
DMP-2200 

PC-1 



Model 



LP-950 
LP- 1000 



RSC- Date 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



1978 
1978 
1979 
1981 
1981 
1982 
1982 



26-2810 
26-28 1 1 



26-2845 
26-1272 
26-1279 
26-3505 



Cat. No 



26-2838 
26-2804 



24 
24 



15 
16.5 



1295 
1599 



17tol7B 
19to21A 



26-2834 
26-2835 
26-2836 



480 
290 
380 
16 



28 
9 



16.5 

16 

16 

1.75 



1199 
3995 
1695 
150 to 128 



22 to 22A 
12 to 14 
15tol7B 
6 to 7 



26-1287 
26-2825 
26-3507 



Table 7 
Laser Printers 




PPM DPI 



Orig. 
Paper Price $ 



6 

o 



300 



8.5 
8.5 



1599 
2199 to 



Table 8 





RSC- Date 



8 


1983 


9 


1983 


10 


1984 


11 


1984 


12 


1985 


13 


1985 


14 


1985 



RSC- 


Date 


15 


1986 


16 


1986 


17 


1987 


17B 


1987 


18 


1987 


18F, 


1987 


19 


1988 



Listed in 
Cat RSC- 



22 to 22A 
19to21A 



RSC- Date 



19E 


1988 


20 


1989 


20A 


1989 


21 


1990 



Ilk 



1991 
1991 







■ - + ' ^," >■ + - +.■ 








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TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995 



Page 31 





^vwO^JX^W^* 




There is no question 

.i^^that the TRS-80 is my 

1^ favorite machine. It al- 

j| ways has been. My first 

ll Model I was a study in 



I frustration, but never- 
I theless, still a joy. My 
^^ Model III was my return 
^ to the 'rear TRS-8ffs, af- 
:::iil ter a brief stint with the 
Color Computers. It felt 
good to be back with a 
DOS machine again. I also messed around with the 
Model 11/12/16 machines, but due to technical diffi- 
culties with the 8-inch drives, I ended up giving 
them away to a friend. My Model lOO's are still 
around - my wife is the prime user But, my TRS-80 
all-time favorite, as you might guess, is the Model 4. 
It has been my steady companion for more than 10 
years. 

It was because of the Model 4 that TRSTimes 
saw the light of day. My favorite computer magazine, 
80 Micro, w^as going out of the TRS-80 business and 
I happened to learn about it early, as several of my 
articles had been accepted and then, for no apparent 
reason, rejected. I made some phonecalls, pressing 
real hard for answers, and was finally told that they 
were ceasing to support the TRS-80 series of comput- 
ers as of the 1988 January issue. Instead, the entire 
magazine would be devoted to the MS-DOS ma- 
chines. 

Hmmm. Here I sat with a bunch of TRS-80 mate- 
rial and nowhere to publish it. It occurred to me that 
maybe I ought to just start my own magazine. I con- 
sulted with Eric Bagai, Tim Sevvell and Roy Beck, all 
influential and knowledgeable members of the Val- 
ley TRS-80 Hackers Group here in Los Angeles. 
They promised to help, as did other friends and rela- 
tives, so TRSTimes was conceived and the birth was 
scheduled for January 1, 1988. 

The next months were busy with rewriting my 
articles, lining up new ones, learning to do desktop 
publishing and, most importantly, getting the news 
out to the TRS-80 world. We sent postcards to every 
TRS user and user group that we were aware of; we 
posted messages on individual BBSes across the 
country and, thanks to Tim's position as TRS-80 
sysop on GEnie, we reached a large number of users 
thero. 

The response w^as overwhelming, I had no idea 
that there were that many people still interested in 



e TRS-80 machines, but the sul; scrip tions and let- 
ters came rolling in and TRSTimes was in business, 

I really had not thought about continuing 
TRSTimes past the initial year. All I wanted to do 
was to produce 6 good issues as I had promised, 1988 
flew by and, though at times it was hectic around 
here, we made it. 

I was having so much fun that I agreed to do an- 
other six issues in 1989. The subscription base grew, 
as did the number of contributors and, while our ma- 
chines were getting older, we were producing new 
and useful information. We also began collecting all 
the public domain software we could get our hands 
on. Many hours were spend testing the programs, as 
w ell as formatting, copying and labeling the disks we 
passed on to the TRSTimes readers. 

Since response was good, we decided to continue 
publishing in 1990. This, in turn, kept us involved in 
1991, 1992, 1993 and 1994, each individual year pro- 
ducing 6 issues. I wrote several of the articles myself 
and I thoroughly enjoyed the research and the pro- 
gramming. Though I prefer programming in assem- 
bler, my favorite TRSTimes program is probably LA- 
BEL4/BAS, a Basic program from issue 1.6. There 
were so many tricks used in that one that I still refer 
to it when writing new programs. 

Each year about this time, IVeTiad to make the 
decision of whether or not to continue publishing 
TRSTimes. We are now at the end of 1995 and the 
magazine has lasted for 8 full years — or to put it 
another way, we have covered the TRS-80 as long as 
did 80 Micro. I think that is enough. We have kept 
information for our favorite machines flowing longer 
than anyone could have imagined and each and ev- 
ery one of our 48 issues were mailed'on time — some- 
thing that I take pride in. But, as is to be expected, 
interest in TRSTimes is dwindling — the subscriber 
base has declined steadily since 1993 and frankly, 1 
think that I've run out of things to write about. 
Therefore, it is with some sadness that I declare this 
to be the very last issue of TRSTimes. I hope that the 
readers have benefitted from reading our publica- 
tion. My appreciation goes out to all the many people 
who, over the years, shared their knowledge with us, 
especially my good friend, Roy Beck, without whose 
articles TRSTimes would not have lasted past the 
first year. 

Goodbye and thanks, 

Lojice W. 



Page 32 



TRSTimes magazine 8.6 - Nov/Dec 1995